Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Always There for the Fans

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Always There for the Fans

Article excerpt

Byline: Lee Ryder Chief Sports Writer lee.ryder@ncjmedia.co.uk

EVERY time I write a story about football matters on Tyneside I feel like I know who I'm doing it for.

Writing for the Chronicle is a dream job for me because, like most Geordies, I was brought up with the paper.

It's always there. In the pub, the factory oor, the cafe, the tea table, the Metro or the bus.

And it's still alive and kicking.

I always remember delivering the Chronicle as a kid around the council estates of Shiremoor.

Often people would be waiting in anticipation to get their paper and, having read what felt like a million back pages during that tim,e it became predictable to gauge people's feelings as they rst glanced at whatever was making the headlines on that particular day.

When the Pink was in operation, crowds used to gather outside the newsagents as the Chron vans screeched to a halt with the latest edition.

Regular drinkers at the Grey Horse would crowd around whoever was clutching the latest footy quiz in Chron in a bid to woo fellow punters with their footy knowledge!

ere was one bloke who used to be waiting for his paper religiously, eager to see what was going on in the world of Newcastle United.

en, the club were a cash-strapped outt in the second division and had sadly became a bit of a laughing stock.

at didn't stop the same bloke every week having a thirst for knowledge, and the same greeting as he waited for his paper, which was: "We've had it if we don't win this weekend", or "I'm not going back if they can't get their act together this time."

But still people turned up in their droves to watch the team and waited patiently for news or change or gossip or just a bit of hope to hang their hats on, that the future could be more than struggling to beat the likes of Oxford and Cambridge.

Doing paper rounds in a close-knit community like "Shire" meant you knew exactly who your audience was. …

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