Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Norris Tops List of Best Jillaroos; Ipswich's Brigginshaw Poised to Join Elite Female League Bracket

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Norris Tops List of Best Jillaroos; Ipswich's Brigginshaw Poised to Join Elite Female League Bracket

Article excerpt

Bomber's Blast

with

Anthony Breeze

THE Big League magazine recently asked past and present Jillaroos players to name the top eight players to have pulled on a jersey.

At eight is the tough New Zealander Trish Hina, who is regarded as the greatest to represent her country.

Seven is the versatile Tarsha Gale, sister of former ARL player Scott, who captained Australia in the first World Cup in 2000.

Six is the ageless Tracey Thompson who began playing in the 90s and is still lacing the boots on today.

Five is Theresa Anderson, who represented her country for nine years and possessed a superb tackling technique.

Four is the daughter of Origin and Test player Rohan Hancock. Stephanie began her career in the centres but now sees herself a star of the game as a prop forward.

Three is the most respected women's footballer to play the game in Karyn Murphy. She has been described as the Darren Lockyer of the game -- cool, calm and tough as nails.

The number two position went to a sportswoman that has been a servant of the game for 16 seasons in Nat Dwyer. She is small in statue but always one of the toughest on the field.

So who was number one? It went to a player that returned to the sport after a broken neck.

Tahnee Norris was voted by almost every player polled to be one of the true greats of the game.

Ipswich product Ali Brigginshaw, who is only at the start of her representative career, will be in this select list after she completes her career.

Coach in hot seat

WHEN your team is playing poorly, the finger pointing comes out and it gets pointed in many different directions.

Some say the players are at fault for missing tackles, dropping balls, not doing what the coach has asked them to do or showing poor discipline. However, more often the person who cops it the most is the coach.

He is the head of the team, he selects the side, he motivates the side and he sets the game plan.

So when the team is languishing at the bottom of the table, club executives decide that something has to be done and most of the time it is bye bye coach.

The latest person to feel this wrath from their club was St George coach Steve Price (pictured) who the powers at be thought it was time to part company. …

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