Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

How Does Your Garden Glow/; Traditionalists Love Pretty Flowers in Pastels While the Bold Prefer a Blast of Vivid Tropicals. the Important Thing Is to Do Things Your Way

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

How Does Your Garden Glow/; Traditionalists Love Pretty Flowers in Pastels While the Bold Prefer a Blast of Vivid Tropicals. the Important Thing Is to Do Things Your Way

Article excerpt

Byline: With Carol Klein of TV's Gardeners' World

PLANTING out continues in our hot beds. Already there are vivid flowers. Lobelia tupa is one of the most spectacular personalities here and though I thought first it might succumb to the cold, it has been in situ now for several years and makes itself completely at home.

This year, it has made fantastic progress and its tall spiky stems are decorated with their strange red flowers. I'm adding another quite different lobelia to the bed.

It's Lobelia 'Queen Victoria', a familiar - though still exciting - plant with dark beetrooty leaves and dense spikes of searing red flowers.

I'm dividing each plant into three as I put them in but they are still decent chunks with several basal rosettes and a couple of flower spikes apiece. They immediately strike a chord with the castor oil plants, which have settled well in this sunbaked corner.

The garden is full of slugs and snails. They're an important part of the food chain.

Hedgehogs, thrushes and blackbirds feed on them and they keep down the debris and detritus that the garden produces.

This sounds very altruistic, but of course there are some times when I curse their munching.

The lobelia that I planted just a few days ago have been hit hard by the predations of gastropods.

Not much that I could have done about it, except plant something less to their liking.

I have added some Rudbeckia 'Rustic Dwarfs' to this planting and they remain unscathed. They have hairy leaves and stems. Opinions vary enormously among gardeners as to the rights and wrongs of using tropical and subtropical plants in the environs of an English garden, especially when they are in a cottage garden such as mine.

One school of thought is that nothing should deviate from the ideal of pastel colours and pretty flowers. On the other hand, pioneering gardeners such as the late Christopher Lloyd feel that rules are there to be broken - a sense of fun and adventure informed everything he did. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.