Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Industrial Revolution; Contrast Is Key to Creating Successful Industrial Interiors, So Combine the Rough with the Smooth Says Claire Hornby

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Industrial Revolution; Contrast Is Key to Creating Successful Industrial Interiors, So Combine the Rough with the Smooth Says Claire Hornby

Article excerpt

THERE'S nothing like stripping back to the basics to do you the world of good - in an interior design sense, of course.

We've been enjoying choppedback, exposed brickwork and glossy bare boards as a design theme for quite some time. Initially inspired by loft living, it's a look that readily adapts itself to most kinds of home and always looks stylish.

The industrial revolution has really made its mark recently, though, with the arrival of reclaimed and reused materials as luxury items in our homes.

The distressed look of recycled wood works wonderfully well in an industrial-style setting - the materials go through a long process of careful wear before they are artfully reconstructed into keynote pieces.

The >simplicity perfect interior Among my favourite items at the moment is the San Quentin Whitney sideboard, handcrafted from reclaimed pine for a rustic finish. The surfaces have been lightly sanded and finished with a water-based sealer to preserve the weathered look.

One designer renowned for his use of exquisitely reused wood is Thomas Bina, and his Hendricks Bonnie Queen bed looks fabulous in an industrial-type room setting. It's a plain yet beautiful shape that's unfussy and strong - robustly stylish in any setting, but particularly effective here.

The Forte bench takes weathering to extremes. Cut from trackable forest trees, the planks are bound in steel and left to age for years so they can slowly dry out in the open air.

Eventually, the planks are kiln-finished and gently hand sanded to preserve the knots, splits and grains, ready to create individual pieces for home or office.

Deliberately textured surfaces like this are important when creating an industrial interior, where it pays to combine the rough with the smooth. So for instance, rough brickwork but a soft rug beneath it; bare windows but plenty of chunkilyframed mirrors to bounce the light around. …

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