Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Kate'second Coming; She's Influenced Foxes, Inspired Rumer, Made the Pierces Cry and Helped Donny Osmond through Difficult Times -- Kate Bush's Biggest Fans Tell David Smyth Why They Think She's Divine

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Kate'second Coming; She's Influenced Foxes, Inspired Rumer, Made the Pierces Cry and Helped Donny Osmond through Difficult Times -- Kate Bush's Biggest Fans Tell David Smyth Why They Think She's Divine

Article excerpt

Byline: David Smyth

THE last time Kate Bush performed a concert in London, the Eventim Apollo was called the Hammersmith Odeon and Margaret Thatcher had just arrived at 10 Downing Street. Probably the most influential female musician that Britain has ever produced is finally back at the same venue later this month -- you can understand the excitement. Demand is such that she's ended up announcing 22 shows here, almost as many as she has played in her all-too-brief touring life in total. In the intervening years her mystique has swelled immeasurably.

She's about the last legend left on the must-see list, but seeing her singing in the flesh will mean much more than just another box ticked. If it wasn't for her creative daring, today's pop world would look very different, as her musician fans reveal overleaf.

Continued on Page 32 'She appeared out of nowhere and sort of embodied the punk spirit by just being completely herself' Continued from Page 31 Anna Calvi I really appreciate the risks Kate Bush takes in her music.

There's something absurd and yet beautiful in her work. That playfulness and imagination is incredibly inspiring. I love her voice and the way she can manipulate it for different songs; sometimes it feels fragile and thin, like a whisper, and other times it feels incredibly forceful and deep. It feels like she can channel so many different characters and yet they all feel distinctly personal and very much her. I love The Morning Fog from Hounds of Love. It's such a sad song, in which she's saying goodbye to her family as she's drowning, and yet it's sung in such an uplifting, beautiful way, which sums up her ability to juxtapose two conflicting feelings or moods through her voice.

Boy George, left Kate Bush has always been a typewriter in a renaissance. She appeared out of nowhere at the tail end of punk and sort of embodied the punk spirit by just being completely herself. I know Johnny Rotten loved her. She blew things apart with things like Running Up That Hill because it defied the classic logic of pop. Kate is unique and a bit of a Greta Garbo, which makes her even more interesting. Most importantly, she's from south-east London, like me.

Catherine Pierce The Pierces The first time I heard Kate Bush's Running Up That Hill I was moved to tears. I don't remember a song ever striking such a chord with me. I was going through a difficult time and it was as though she was reading my heart. Still, every time I listen to it, it invokes a feeling that makes me instantly go inward. It's one of those songs that I wish I had written and would love to cover, but wouldn't dare because I don't think there could be a more perfect version.

Holly Johnson Formerly of Frankie Goes to Hollywood It's hard to think of Kate Bush as flesh and blood and not some mythological creature or forest faery weaving her musical web of dreams. From the moment I heard Wuthering Heights on the radio in 1979 I was enchanted. It was a newsworthy event, the sound of her voice, her uniqueness, what stories would she tell us.

She came out of the British landscape at a moment of post-punk despair. Even David Bowie's mentor Lindsay Kemp wasn't quite aware that the girl who came to dance, who was sewing backstage for his company, was to have quite such an international impact. Her legend has grown with the years, as her body of work has continued to evolve. Possessing all of the three graces, she has enthralled us for decades and held us in her spell.

Rumer Having six older siblings, I got to listen to artists like Kate Bush from an early age. When rifling though my older sisters' bedroom one day, I found Hounds of Love. I loved the album so much it barely left the tape recorder, although I always had to run across the room to fast-forward Waking the Witch because it was too scary! That was my first introduction to her wild and rugged musical landscape, and that unique inner world. …

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