Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

ED: I'LL HIT SINNERS TO PAY FOR ANGELS; MILIBAND TO TARGET TAX DODGERS, TOBACCO FIRMS AND HOMEOWNERS'Doctors and Nurses Need Time to Care, Not to Be Rushed Offtheir Feet'

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

ED: I'LL HIT SINNERS TO PAY FOR ANGELS; MILIBAND TO TARGET TAX DODGERS, TOBACCO FIRMS AND HOMEOWNERS'Doctors and Nurses Need Time to Care, Not to Be Rushed Offtheir Feet'

Article excerpt

Byline: Joe Murphy Political Editor, in Manchester

PLEDGE TO HIRE 20,000 MORE NURSES WITHIN FIVE YEARS ED MILIBAND will target tobacco firms, tax dodgers and London's wealthy homeowners to pay for 36,000 more NHS nurses, doctors, midwives and care workers.

In his final party conference speech before the 2015 general election, the Labour leader declared his party was "ready" to govern and appealed to the whole country to "work together" for a better Britain.

He put a PS2.5 billion injection into the NHS at the heart of Labour's campaign, saying it would create a health service "with time to care" instead of hard-pressed nurses "rushed off their feet". Within five years, he said, Labour would BIG BEASTS IN BATTLE FOR MAYOR FULL STORY PAGES 10 & 11 provide 20,000 more nurses, 8,000 more family doctors, 5,000 care home workers and 3,000 midwives.

Symbolically, he targeted "sinners" to pay for the "angels" of the NHS. Some PS1.1 billion will be raised from hedge funds that operate aggressive tax avoidance schemes. Another PS150 million will come from a raid on cigarette companies "who make soaring profits on the back of ill health".

More controversially, the biggest sum of money -- about PS1.2 billion -- will be raised with a mansion tax on homes worth PS2 million or more.

A backlash was in full swing today, with industry experts warning that the tax would overwhelmingly hit London properties and could dent the property market. Labour's Continued on Page 8 Continued from Page 1 leader did not use notes as he made one of the longest and most important keynote speeches of his life. He told 4,000 delegates and observers in the giant Manchester hall: "We need to make sure there is a NHS there when we need it.

"We are going to have to transform the way the NHS works in the years ahead. We need doctors, nurses, care workers, midwives able to spend proper time with us, not to be rushed off their feet."

Mr Miliband appealed for 10 years in office for a Labour government to repair what he called the damage to Britain caused by the Tory-led coalition.

Setting out a series of national goals, he echoed Margaret Thatcher by vowing to double the number of first time homebuyers to about 400,000 a year, and confirmed plans to give half of Britain's youngsters an apprenticeship. But it was the health service that had been saved up as his main theme.

Recalling spending a day and night with staff at a hospital in Watford, he said the "biggest lesson" had been that if the NHS had more capacity it could prevent patients from becoming more sick and save money in the long run.

"If people can't get to see their GP, if they can't get the care they need at home, they end up in hospital when that could have been avoided," he said. "That's bad for them, and it costs billions of pounds. …

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