Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

These Will Do a Fatty Lot of Good; Know Your Fatty Acids from Your Faddy Acids? Oil the Cogs with These Omega Basics, Says ABI JACKSON

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

These Will Do a Fatty Lot of Good; Know Your Fatty Acids from Your Faddy Acids? Oil the Cogs with These Omega Basics, Says ABI JACKSON

Article excerpt

WE ALL know that omegas are important to our health, but are you entirely clear on which ones do what? And does eating foods with lots of one kind of omega, make up for not getting much of another? While some fatty acids play roles in similar or closely linked functions within the body, there's a whole load of complex science behind how they really work. Even if you don't know all this science, having a rough idea of the basics will still help.

Contradictory headlines can confuse us, and as such, recent research has suggested a lot of people are still confused over whether all dietary fats are 'bad', and which ones are 'good'.

If you want some clarification, and if you want to make omegas your amigos, read on...

OMEGA 3 |IMPORTANT FOR:Heart health, brain function and preventing diseases.

FIND IT IN:Oily fish, flax, linseed, walnuts and certain oils. ARGUABLY the most well-known of the omegas, there's been a wealth of research into omega 3 and its benefits, particularly for heart health and brain function in children and adults (some studies have even suggested eating fish during pregnancy may improve childhood neurodevelopment).

Omega help boost In fact Babi Chana, biochemist and nutritionist for dietary supplements and vitmains suppliers Pharma Nord, believes that increasing omega 3 intake is the single biggest change - in terms of health benefits - we could make in our diets.

"Increasing our omega 3 intake can help safeguard against brain and behavioural problems, including mood, behaviour and learning ability, heart and circulatory disease, stroke, pain and inflammation, diabetes, cancer, autoimmune diseases, asthma, skin disorders and all manner of chronic illnesses," she explains.

"Other fats in the diet are used as storage or fuel, but omega 3s are functional and play an extensive role as messenger substances known as eicosanoids, which control blood clotting, blood pressure, pain, inflammation, as well as structural roles in all cell membranes that profoundly affect the sensitivity of each cell to respond to messages from hormones, enzymes, immune signals and neurotransmitters.

"It is the only substance that gives us the gift of sight; vision is only possible due to the concentration of omega 3s on the retina."

Omega 3 is known as an 'essential' fatty acid as the body can't produce it, "so it's really important you get enough in the foods you eat", notes British Dietetic Association spokesperson, Emer Delaney.

capsules can your intake "Foods rich in omega 3 include oily fish, like salmon, mackerel, herring, trout and fresh tuna, flaxseed and walnuts.

"Linseed, rapeseed, soya and walnut oils are other good sources."

Because oily fish may contain contaminates, which over time could build up in the body to potentially damaging levels, guidelines advise people to eat between two and four portions per week. …

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