Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Off on Paycation; WORK Need a Holiday but Have No Leave Left? It's Time for a New Job in Tech Where Bosses Will Pay for a Getaway before You Start, Says Phoebe Luckhurst

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Off on Paycation; WORK Need a Holiday but Have No Leave Left? It's Time for a New Job in Tech Where Bosses Will Pay for a Getaway before You Start, Says Phoebe Luckhurst

Article excerpt

Byline: Phoebe Luckhurst

OCTOBER. Fetid leaves once crisp and russet, now damp and rotting cling to drains; it's dark by lunchtime. Your bones ache and your joints seize. Your eyes speak of a malaise disproportionate to the matter at hand, namely the predictable arrival of autumn.

You know you're being a bit wet, but then so are your shoes (when will the rain stop?). You could force your chin up but, frankly, you'd rather go on holiday and leave the painful ache of the quotidian behind. You've started Googling wheelie suitcases and fantasising about Ryanair a disquieting mental tic that is convincing you further that you need to get far, far away from here (on a BA plane. Or Virgin Atlantic).

Alternatively, you should change jobs. Specifically you should see if 42Floors a San Francisco-based commercial property start-up - is hiring. The company has instated a "pre-cation" policy: all new-starters must take a two-week paid holiday before joining the company. CEO and founder Jason Freedman instigated this after headhunting a candidate who was totally wiped out by his current role. The guy was thrilled and signed on the dotted line.

Atlassian, another San Franciscobased start-up (which also has an outpost in Sydney) also pushes the pre-cation policy: it offers every new starter a travel voucher and encourages them to take a holiday before they join the company predictably, it also offers unlimited holidays.

"It was only a couple of weeks," Freedman told US magazine Slate. But he came in so refreshed and energised, it was amazing We have a guy who's about to start next week, and he's in Thailand right now. It's like, 'Yeah, have a great time! And when you get back here, work your ass off'."

For this is the plain subtext: cynics would call it exquisite blackmail. New starters will feel indebted to their kind new employer, incentivising them to work harder. It is undeniably expensive. Indeed, the policy could be termed a paycation it's entirely subsidised by the new company though bosses reckon it's worth the financial outlay to ensure staff arrive refreshed not beleaguered. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.