Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Weekendvy Green with; TRENDS Had a Dry Friday and Sad Saturday? Turn Your Sunday into a Fantasy Fun Day Just Be Sure You Get Your Story Straight, Says Phoebe Luckhurst

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Weekendvy Green with; TRENDS Had a Dry Friday and Sad Saturday? Turn Your Sunday into a Fantasy Fun Day Just Be Sure You Get Your Story Straight, Says Phoebe Luckhurst

Article excerpt

Byline: says Phoebe Luckhurst

MOST conversation pivots on competition. If you're honest, you're only half-listening to your mate's anecdote about their Saturday night (featuring four tequila shots, three clubs and an incident with a tramp and a bottle of Crabbie's) because you're formulating your own (featuring five tequila shots, four clubs and two incidents involving the homeless one also involving the police).

Obviously yours gets the bigger laugh. Your friend shoots you the injured glance of the rightfully vanquished but you know natural selection makes the world go around. Not your fault you're eminently the more natural entertainer.

Uncomfortably, you quash the trifling voice reminding you your anecdote was entirely fabricated. Really, your only altercation with tequila was in the booze aisle at the big Sainsbury's in Clapham, where you were buying a fruity sauvignon for a Saturday night in front of The X Factor. The bit with the policeman was actually a nod from a copper presumably commending you for being such a stand-up citizen by carrying the vino in a bag for life.

You just played the "weekendvy" card: fibbing about having had a big one because you're terrified everyone else is having a better time than you. It's embedded in the culture of the office; indeed, in some offices, weekendvy is virtually legitimised as policy. At Moo -- a Shoreditch startup that prints custom business cards and stationery -- there's a Monday morning ritual that demands employees stand up in front of the room and detail their escapades.

"The product team here at Moo start their Monday morning meeting by comparing weekend stories to see who has had the most interesting weekend," explains Teresa Pereira, VP brand and communications at Moo. "The winner sits at the top of the leaderboard until Monday rolls around again and the top slot is up for grabs."

It's endemic. Research by Travelodge states that three-quarters of adults worry that everyone else is living it larger than they are; a third of us lie about our weekends. The most popular lies include telling everyone you had a massive Saturday night, saying you did something wacky and adventurous, pretending you were on a mind- or body-enhancing course or training programme, eating out somewhere famous and claiming you spent the weekend romping from dusk till dawn on a sexy mini-break. …

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