Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

Funding Recipients Named; RADF-Supported Exhibition, Paper-Based Sculpture the New Leaf, Accompanies Presentation Event

Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

Funding Recipients Named; RADF-Supported Exhibition, Paper-Based Sculpture the New Leaf, Accompanies Presentation Event

Article excerpt

THE 2014-2015 Round One recipients of the Gladstone Region Regional Arts Development Fund were awarded on Sunday at a funding presentation ceremony at the Tondoon Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre Gallery.

The presentation was held in conjunction with the official launch of Felicia Lloyd's RADF-supported project The New Leaf: an altered book exhibition, featuring works on paper and paper-based sculpture created by 45 artists across Queensland.

The RADF is a Queensland Government and Gladstone Regional Council partnership program to support local arts and culture.

The next round closes Tuesday, March 31, 2015, for projects that start after May 1 next year.

For further information please phone 49766766 or email gragm@gladstonerc.qld.gov.au.

Art awards

AN ASTONISHING 1200 visitors have been into the gallery and museum for the first week of the 2014 Rio Tinto Alcan Martin Hanson Memorial Art Awards.

This year, 278 works are on display across four categories: Easel Paintings, Works on Paper, Three Dimensional & Fibre Works and Digital Works.

More than 60% of entries are from locally based artists and more than half the entries have been entered into Section 1 Easel Paintings.

Jan Ross-Manley is a Section 1 artist whose work, Pastoral Portrait 11 Moncton Hills and Brahman, has been garnering significant local attention since the exhibition opening.

Ross-Manley has been inspired by the Gladstone Region's pastoral history and has been researching old stock brands still in use in the area that date back to the pioneer past.

Her work, Pastoral Portrait 11 Moncton Hills, features the brands and earth pigments sourced directly from the land of the Parsons family who were early farming pioneers of Raglan.

Ross-Manley said that the pastoral portrait had a long tradition in art history as a genre and this interpretation put a modern twist on an old theme, where the graphic element of the brand speaks directly of the farmer's trademark and business card.

She said that the brands "emanated the history and character of the Parsons family, as well as the shadowy presence of the numerous beasts that have carried the marks over time". …

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