Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Health Notes

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Health Notes

Article excerpt

$1.2 MILLION GRANT TO HELP MAYO RESEARCH ON ALZHEIMER'S

Three researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville have received $1.2 million from the newly funded Florida Health Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer's Research Program to study various aspects of Alzheimer's disease. The program was created earlier this year by the state to support research of Alzheimer's disease.

The grant award recipients are: Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, a neurologist and neuroscientist who will focus on how the disease affects African-Americans; Rosa Rademakers, a neuroscientist who will study early-onset Alzheimer's disease; and Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist who will target the effects of gender on the disease.

Florida has more Alzheimer's patients than any other state except California. More than 480,000 Floridians have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. By 2025 that number is expected to grow by 50 percent to 720,000.

BAPTIST BEHAVIORAL OFFERS NEW DEPRESSION THERAPY

Baptist Behavioral Health is offering a new brain stimulation therapy to help people suffering from severe depression who have not had success with antidepressant medications.

NeuroStar TMS Therapy is a non-invasive, outpatient procedure which uses a pulsed magnetic field to stimulate function in brain regions known to affect mood. The NeuroStar System is the first transcranial magnetic stimulation device approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of depression.

The therapy, which is performed in an outpatient office of Baptist Behavioral Health, lasts about 40 minutes. Patients receive daily outpatient care for four to six weeks and resume normal activities immediately after each treatment.

Major depressive disorder is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. Each year about 6.7 percent of adults - more than 14 million people - experience major depressive disorder, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

MAYO POLYPS STUDY MAY SPEED DIAGNOSIS

It may not be necessary for experienced gastroenterologists to send polyps they remove from a patient's colon to a pathologist for examination, according to a large study conducted by researchers at the Jacksonville campus of Mayo Clinic. …

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