Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Just-in-Time' Talent in High Demand; the Capital Is at Risk of Grinding to a Halt with Temps Being Pulled in Often at the Last Minute to Keep Services, Banking, Industry and Transport Running. the 24/7 Working Week Is Now Replacing the Out-of-Date 9 to 5. by Niki Chesworth

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Just-in-Time' Talent in High Demand; the Capital Is at Risk of Grinding to a Halt with Temps Being Pulled in Often at the Last Minute to Keep Services, Banking, Industry and Transport Running. the 24/7 Working Week Is Now Replacing the Out-of-Date 9 to 5. by Niki Chesworth

Article excerpt

Byline: Niki Chesworth

LONDON is often 'just hours away' from failing to deliver key services, due to a lack of available workforce. Organisations and key services providers are being forced to pull in an army of temporary staff often at the last minute. More than half of temp vacancies in industries such as logistics, transport, retail and manufacturing need to be filled by a candidate on the same day.

Matthew Sanders, CEO of Zoek, the new mobile app for job seekers, warns: "In these key sectors there may only be hours to recruit an appropriately experienced person before a shift begins. Finding this 'just-in-time talent' is becoming increasingly difficult."

Zoek analysed 3.6 million hours worked by temporary workers in seven key London employment sectors during 2014 and found that increasingly the 24/7 culture means working outside the traditional 9am to 5pm.

A quarter of London's workforce (24 per cent) works on a Saturday and 16 per cent on a Sunday, according to the Office for National Statistics.

In addition, in recent months there has been a doubling in the number of temps working anti-social hours.

Between the second and fourth quarters of last year, the number of people working in the evenings or through the weekend increased by 102 per cent.

Some sectors are suffering more than others. Almost a quarter (23 per cent) of community and social care temp provision happens at the weekend, as does 18 per cent of manufacturing activity and 16 per cent of utilities work. Beyond the hotel and retail trade, where weekend demand is understandably high, construction (eight per cent) and financial/business services (five per cent) emerged higher than expected in their use of temporary workers across the weekend. The findings come as the Government released figures showing a sharp rise in the number of zero hours contracts with 697,000 UK workers not knowing how many hours they will work a week. These are in addition to the army of just-in-time temps. …

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