Newspaper article Daily News (Warwick, Australia)

The Unspoken Terror Behind Castle Walls; Today the Daily News Proudly Stands with Domestic Violence Victims to Fight This Deadly Epidemic. Kerri Moore Reports

Newspaper article Daily News (Warwick, Australia)

The Unspoken Terror Behind Castle Walls; Today the Daily News Proudly Stands with Domestic Violence Victims to Fight This Deadly Epidemic. Kerri Moore Reports

Article excerpt

ON AVERAGE, Warwick police respond to pleas to help a domestic violence victim once a day.

Many times it is the victim who is desperate for officers to quell a volatile and potentially dangerous situation.

Other times it is prompted by a fearful friend, a desperate loved one or a concerned neighbour.

Warwick's Bette Bonney, who has worked with domestic violence victims for over a decade, said everyone had a role in wiping this insidious behaviour from society.

"The Australian way is often that 'what goes on in a man's castle is his business' and we don't want to interfere," she said.

"If people suspect something is going on, it is important they don't ignore it but pick up the phone to make an anonymous call to police.

"It isn't just important - it could save a life."

Mrs Bonney said although she understood how real the problem was in the community, many were often shocked to hear just how often it happened.

"If people aren't involved and aren't inside those networks they don't realise what is happening. They often think it can't happen in a quiet country town like ours," she said.

"Or when people hear 'DV', they think it has to be a low socio-economic area, but it happens to all different people from all different levels in the community.

"It isn't just a man beating up on a woman; it can be the other way around, adolescent boys beating up on their mothers and elder abuse, which is adults who should know better controlling and hurting their elderly parents."

Mrs Bonney said an exposure to violence at a young age could normalise the behaviour and it was important to not only support those affected children but to educate all children.

"This is extremely important because otherwise kids can be left with no one to stand up for them and no one to turn to - they are left without a voice," she said.

"Victims often get brainwashed by the perpetrator and they believe they deserve the violence.

"We need to educate people and that starts in schools. We need to teach our children that people should respect you and you need to respect others to get that respect.

"If we start that at a young age we will plant the seed for them to grow into adults who have that in the back of their minds. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.