Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

A Historic Tour around the Sights of Old Wallsend; A New Book Takes Us on a Historical and Pictorial Tour of Wallsend. DAVE MORTON Heads Back in Time

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

A Historic Tour around the Sights of Old Wallsend; A New Book Takes Us on a Historical and Pictorial Tour of Wallsend. DAVE MORTON Heads Back in Time

Article excerpt

Byline: DAVE MORTON

A NEW pocket-sized book takes us on a historical tour of Wallsend.

Written by Ken Hutchinson, one of the region's leading local history writers, the book takes readers on a guided tour through the famous Tyneside town.

Packed with outstanding archive pictures, informative editorial, and an OS map, 'Wallsend History Tour' is an authoritative guide to the area's historical landmarks and locations.

Ken, a former town planner and a tour guide for Newcastle City Guides, said: "Wallsend has constantly changed over time and continues to do so."

The book explains how Wallsend started life as the Roman fort of Segedunum in AD 126 and soon developed a vicus, or town, outside the fort walls to accommodate the soldiers' families, local businesses and the bathhouse.

Over the next three centuries the fort and the town s a w many changes.

NOSTALGIA The Newcastle United 1956-See Sport When the Roman occupation ended in the fifth century, the fort was eventually abandoned.

Ken went on: "The stones were used by the monks of Jarrow and Tynemouth as well as local farmers, and the land reverted back to agriculture."

A new township developed at Wallsend Green away from the riverside, probably to avoid Danish or Viking raiders using the river.

In the mid-12th century, Holy Cross church was built midway between the villages of Wallsend and Willington to serve the communities of farmers in the townships.

From around the same time a small settlement grew up on the riverside around the local salt pans at Howdon Panns, later developing other industries including shipbuilding, rope making and whaling.

From the late 1700s, coal mining commenced in the area. Colliery houses were built close to the many pit shafts, and waggonways were built to transport the coal to the River Tyne, where it could be loaded on to ships.

'Wallsend Coal' was world famous for its quality, but in 1835 the worst ever mining disaster took place at Wallsend Colliery, with the loss of 102 men and boys. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.