Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Share the Music - Not the Mud; Didn't Get a Ticket for the Real Deal? Never Mind - KEELEY BOLGER Suggests You Should Just Grab Your Remote and Tune in at Home

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Share the Music - Not the Mud; Didn't Get a Ticket for the Real Deal? Never Mind - KEELEY BOLGER Suggests You Should Just Grab Your Remote and Tune in at Home

Article excerpt

Byline: KEELEY BOLGER

THERE was a time when Glastonbury tickets were just PS1, with the lucky 1,500 punters promised free, fresh milk to drink and an ox roast to feast on to boot - but 45 years on, it's a whole different story.

This year, some 135,000 ticketholders will once again descend on the famous site in Somerset, to watch the likes of The Who and Pharrell (and pray for sunshine). But while music festivals are now ten a penny, for some, Glasto takes a lot of beating.

"I love the first time you arrive on site, there's nothing like it," says festival veteran Jo Whiley, who's joining up with Dermot O'Leary for Radio 2's coverage, and Lauren Laverne and Mark Radcliffe for BBC Two's TV highlights.

"There's the tingle of anticipation and then the breathtaking view of the festival cityscape, and myriad of tents blending into one beautiful vision. The best time of day is as the sun goes down and the lights start twinkling, it's unreal."

Magical as that might be, for those who want to give the mud baths, submerged tents and crowds a wide berth, the BBC is once again offering extensive TV, radio and online coverage of the event, from Friday, June 26 until Sunday, June 28.

As Luren puts it: "I think the live streams of the stages are as close to being there as you can get. Those spectacular shots of the Pyramid Stage performances are really special."

To get you in the mood for a weekend of live music - all from the comfort of your own sofa - here's a look at some of the highlights in store, along with some fun facts and figures...

THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT TO keep all the punters occupied throughout the five-day event, there will be music, spoken word and poetry, plus all sorts of workshops and films played out on more than 100 stages across the 900-acre site. The biggest stage is the Pyramid which should have been headlined by rockers Foo Fighters.

However, due to Dave Grohl's accident Florence and the Machine will now take the top slot. Others on this stage include metallers Motorhead and US singer-songwriter Mary J Blige on the Friday, rapper Kanye West, Pharrell, crooner Burt Bacharach and Paloma Faith on the Saturday, rounding things off with classic rockers The Who, along with Lionel Richie, Patti Smith and Paul Weller on the Sunday.

Generally speaking, BBC Two is the channel to watch for the biggest names, BBC Three for the current crop of music stars, while BBC Four will take a look at stars from years gone by.

FAN FAVOURITE THERE is no shortage of standout moments from Glastonbury. Cast your mind back to 2010, and there's Stevie Wonder (and a slightly less tuneful Michael Eavis) serenading the crowd with a version of Happy Birthday to celebrate the festival's 40th anniversary.

Go further back to 2004, and Paul McCartney led a chorus of thousands in a sing-song of Hey Jude. …

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