Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

The Tyne-Built Victims of WWI

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

The Tyne-Built Victims of WWI

Article excerpt

Byline: Dave Morton Nostalgia Editor david.morton.editorial@ncjmedia.co.uk

FOR many of us, World War I conjures up powerful images of the trenches and tragedy of the Western Front.

It was a conflict, of course, enacted in several corners of the globe.

And it was a war fought not just on battlefields, but - for the first time - in the air, and also at sea.

The major sea battle of the Great War is considered to be the Battle of Jutland. Next year marks the centenary of the decisive encounter which effectively was a victory for Britain's Royal Navy, despite it losing more vessels than the enemy. Germany's threat at sea was massively diminished.

Ken Smith, a local historian, author, and expert on the history of Tyne shipbuilding, said: "A number of great warships built on the Tyne took part in the Battle of Jutland.

"Among those which fought were the battlecruisers HMS Queen Mary, sunk with the loss of more than 1,000 lives, and HMS Invincible, which was also sunk with great loss of life.

"The Queen Mary was built by Palmers of Jarrow, and the Invincible by Armstrong Whitworth of Elswick, Newcastle." Ken added: "Other Tyne ships taking part in the battle included the Swan Hunter-built cruiser HMS Comus, which survived the epic clash, the Armstrong Whitworth-built battleship HMS Malaya (launched at the Walker Naval Yard), which although damaged survived and went on to serve during the Second World War, and the destroyer HMS Shark (Swan Hunter), which was sunk." Now, scans of ships destroyed at Jutland 99 years ago have been made for the first time using 21st Century technology.

The Royal Navy's survey ship HMS Echo has created the colourful threedimensional images of HMS Invincible which was one of 25 ships - 14 British - which were blown up in just one day of the First World War on May 31 1916, off the coast of Denmark. …

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