Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Oliver's Twist on Superfood; Jamie Oliver Embarks on a Global Adventure to Uncover the Secrets of Long Life for His Latest TV Outing. the Chef Tells KEELEY BOLGER How What He Discovered about Food Taught Him a Thing or Two PICK OF THE WEEK JAMIE'S SUPERFOOD (Channel 4, Monday, 8pm)

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Oliver's Twist on Superfood; Jamie Oliver Embarks on a Global Adventure to Uncover the Secrets of Long Life for His Latest TV Outing. the Chef Tells KEELEY BOLGER How What He Discovered about Food Taught Him a Thing or Two PICK OF THE WEEK JAMIE'S SUPERFOOD (Channel 4, Monday, 8pm)

Article excerpt

Byline: KEELEY BOLGER

IN THE 10 years since his landmark Jamie's School Dinners series, Jamie Oliver has campaigned far and wide. From intensive farming and obesity, to the nation's lack of cooking knowledge, the passionate chef has used his might and meddling to try to improve our awareness of issues surrounding grub.

And now the 40-year-old fatherof-four is once again turning his attention to healthy eating, and in particular, how eating well can dramatically improve life expectancy.

Called Jamie's Superfood, this six-part series sees the Essex-raised chef travel to Costa Rica, Okinawa in Japan and the Greek island of Ikaria, which has the "most centenarians in the world", to discover their secrets to long life. Then, back in the UK, he whips up easy and nutritious recipes incorporating some of the 'hero' ingredients he's discovered along the way.

But what else do you need to know about the series? Let's tuck in.

THE SIMPLE LIFE DURING his travels, Jamie picked up on a few pointers in the quest to extend life expectancy, but for him, it boils down to a few simple things.

Jamie |and his "I think the key to along healthy life, in very crude terms, is to cook fresh food and grow stuff," he explains.

PLANET ORGANIC WHILE organic food has a reputation as being the preserve of the middle class, Jamie wants to make it attainable for all.

"All of these people in long life areas are not rich, or what we perceive as middle class," he says.

"They're all what we perceive as lower income families and all of them eat organically."

Although, compared to many, his nutritional knowledge is pretty good, his travels still inspired him to make changes at home.

"You start to think, 'S**t, I'm going to plant some more veg'," he admits, laughing, and pointing out that he's planning on buying six goats to live in his garden.

MORNING GLORY OUR poor relationship with breakfast was brought into sharp focus during filming.

"(People say), 'I won't have breakfast because that will save calories and I'm trying to lose a bit of weight', or, 'I'm too busy'," Jamie explains. "And then we get into the other story, where over the last 30 years, we've been completely brainwashed into thinking, 'You've got 45 seconds to pour some milk on some cereal in a bowl and that's all you deserve, so get on with it..."' Starkly enough, Jamie learned that those who do regularly eat breakfast are actually "three times less likely to be obese". …

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