Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

For All on the Journey

Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

For All on the Journey

Article excerpt

Byline: John Pickering and Margaret Crane

IT'S the guilty secret many parents are reluctant to admit aloud - no matter how much you love your kids, being a parent can make you feel bad.

But Google knows you're not alone. Look up the phrase "guilty parent" and you'll get more than 70 million results. Unfortunately, most of that advice is based on opinion, folklore or individual experience, it's rarely based on evidence.

So what exactly do we know about the causes of parental guilt? And how can you turn feeling bad into a change for the better?

Don't worry - it's normal.

The first, and perhaps most important, thing to know about parental guilt is that, at some point, every parent will experience it.

One of the best parts of our work is running parenting classes, where complete strangers from all walks of life come to learn evidence-based strategies to increase their confidence and skills.

We start each new class by asking parents why they've come. And in every class, as we work our way around the room, one parent after another admits that they are not sure what to do - they've read the books, Googled the answers, listened to their neighbours, tried the old wives' tales, and whatever they try still isn't working.

As they share their stories, the mood in the room lifts. People start to smile in recognition - maybe they're not the only ones who are struggling with life's greatest gift - their children.

Understanding the guilty brain

People feel guilt when their actions or thoughts don't match their standards for themselves. It is considered a moral emotion that helps us regulate our interactions with others.

Guilt can be useful when it enables us to be self-reflective and to pay attention to others' emotions. When a person feels guilty, they experience an increased activation of brain areas involved with taking another person's perspective and being empathic. As a result, guilt often motivates people to make amends.

However, guilt can be a harmful emotion - especially because not everyone who feels guilty takes action to decrease their guilt. When people feel guilty, they are likely first to withdraw from the situation. …

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