Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

CQ Loses the Plot Recycling Rubbish; Contaminated Recycling Waste Piles Up at Rocky Landfill since Introduction of Yellow Bins

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

CQ Loses the Plot Recycling Rubbish; Contaminated Recycling Waste Piles Up at Rocky Landfill since Introduction of Yellow Bins

Article excerpt

Byline: Madeline McDonald madeline.mcdonald@capnews.com.au

RECYCLABLES:

Junk mail, magazines, newspapers, milk cartons

Soft drink cans, beer cans, food tins, plastic containers.

Glass bottles and jars.

For an extensive list go to rockhampton region.qld.gov.au.

YOU'D EXPECT to find bike tyres, rubber thongs and boxes of old baby clothes in the usual household garage.

But where you don't expect to see them is in a bright yellow wheelie bin with the word recycling on it.

But located at the Rockhampton Landfill are piles and piles ... and piles of rejected waste that has come from people's recycling bins in the past few months.

Rockhampton councillor Neil Fisher said seeing the bales, each made up of contaminated recyclables from about 400 bins, was an indication of why the region's once reputable recycling standard had decreased.

"When recycling was first introduced to CQ we had the bags and we were at the very top as far as keeping our recyclables," Cr Fisher said.

"We had little to no contamination but now we've gotten the bins, we seem to have gotten a bit lazier and our contamination rate probably puts us as one of the worst areas in the country. It's really distressing to see each one of these bales had items that were put in a recycle bin which are now sitting in our landfill."

This section of the Rockhampton Landfill is where the contaminated bales are buried into the ground, then capped by a large about of soil.

The length of this section of the landfill is about 30 bales long, each row with two bales high and about 20 bales in length with 15 bales already being buried.

Cr Fisher said this section of the site consisted of contaminated recyclables collected since Cyclone Marcia.

"Landfills are very expensive to operate so the more material you can divert from a landfill the better it is for every ratepayer," Cr Fisher said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.