Newspaper article Gympie Times, The Qld.

Not Critical - out of ICU; Gympie Blogger and Gympie Times Columnist Bruce Devereaux Shares the Most Recent, Wonderful News on Wife Tracey's Progress in Her Life and Death Struggle for Life

Newspaper article Gympie Times, The Qld.

Not Critical - out of ICU; Gympie Blogger and Gympie Times Columnist Bruce Devereaux Shares the Most Recent, Wonderful News on Wife Tracey's Progress in Her Life and Death Struggle for Life

Article excerpt

THANK you for saving my life," Tracey told the surgeon who's managing her case when he came to see her yesterday.

"You saved your life," he told her, although I'm pretty sure she couldn't have done this without him.

No one wants to take credit for the medical miracle that is lying beside me in her hospital bed while I type this. A bed, I should point out, which is no longer in ICU.

Being that it means Tracey is no longer considered on the critical list, you'd think I'd be a lot happier about her moving to a ward, but despite some rocky moments in our brief time together, I like ICU.

I like unique ICU things, such as there's a nurse beside my wife's bed around the clock and a doctor just over her shoulder.

I like the attention the ICU people give her.

I just plain like these people.

Actually, that's not right - I don't like the people who work in ICU, I LOVE them.

And because I want each of them to know how much they mean to this family, not because they were so integral in saving Tracey's life but rather because of the way they do their jobs, I took them some more fancy donuts today as a final 'thank you for saving my wife's life' treat.

It really doesn't seem like enough.

Still, despite a little separation anxiety on my behalf, things are apparently progressing nicely.

Tracey's tummy has leaked multiple times since the skin graft, with the dressing needing to be changed six times in one evening, but the ward staff were right there to do it.

Doctors are still popping in regularly and she's in what I would describe as a 'high-dependency' room, right across from the nurses' central reception desk area.

There's probably a proper hospital word for that area but I don't know it.

Even better, the move to a ward on Sunday has been quickly followed by more and more good news. For example, the central venous line (I had to ask a nurse to write that one down) has been removed from her neck and a PICC line put into her arm. …

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