Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

This Is the Sound of Violence; Documentary Gives Voice to Violent Men Learning How to Change Their Lives and Salvage Relationships

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

This Is the Sound of Violence; Documentary Gives Voice to Violent Men Learning How to Change Their Lives and Salvage Relationships

Article excerpt

Byline: Sherele Moody

Domestic Violence

CALL ME DAD puts an uncompromising spotlight on voices that are rarely heard - the male perpetrators of family violence. The 60-minute film also shines a light on a potentially powerful behaviour change program for men with a history of violence. It is also the first time anywhere in the world, television cameras have been allowed to film inside a men's behaviour change program. Call Me Dad will air on the ABC at 8.30pm on Thursday, November26. Watch the trailer: www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTJelM_HehU.

THE fragile beams of a Monday's dying light push weakly against the encroaching dusk filling this anonymous suburban classroom.

The sounds of kids chattering and scribbling in school books faded hours ago.

They are replaced by the aimless chatter of six men rifling through a bunch of nametags piled on a teacher's desk.

One of the small white rectangles belongs to a bloke called Justin - a tall fellow with work-hardened hands and the shadow of a beard.

The father-of-two looks at the ground and speaks of missing "me kids".

"I've been controlling the money," he says to the strangers sitting with him in a tight semi-circle. "I've been controlling her friends. I've done everything from grab her, to hit her, to hold her on the ground - a lot of things that were way out of line."

This is the first time the 40-year-old has ventured into the confines of men's behaviour change group Heavy M.E.T.A.L.

Justin (pictured above) is one of three Heavy M.E.T.A.L clients who share their stories in Call Me Dad - a 60-minute documentary directed by Sophie Wiesner.

The group is a place where drinking, disrespectful behaviour towards women and tardiness are expellable sins.

The hard-working tree surgeon speaks haltingly, struggling to admit that he is a violent abuser who beat his former partner so badly that he broke her collarbone.

"I've been getting told a lot that I'm an angry, angry man," Justin says in a "hard done by" tone of voice. …

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