Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Why, after 175 Years, They Are Still Having the Time of Their Lives at This City Institution

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Why, after 175 Years, They Are Still Having the Time of Their Lives at This City Institution

Article excerpt

Byline: Tony Henderson Title in here name@ncjmedia.co.uk

OUR love of a bargain and a dream of hitting the jackpot has sustained the Antiques Roadshow for decades.

One of TV's longest running offerings, and its lesser spin-offs, thrive on the car boot item which turns out to be worth serious money, and the handme-down family piece which is not only venerable but also exceedingly valuable.

This is the mix which underpins the enduring popularity of auctions, together with the chance to pick up a little piece of history, an object of beauty, or add to a collection.

It is why Newcastle auctioneers Anderson & Garland will be celebrating their 175th anniversary with their fine art and antiques sale from December 1-3.

William Anderson and George Hedley opened their Great Northern Auction Rooms in 1840 in Pilgrim Street in Newcastle.

A merger with Atkinson and Garland evolved into Anderson & Garland and a move in 1913 to new premises in Market Street.

Having outgrown that, there was another change of location in 1988 to an Edwardian building in Marlborough Crescent.

In 2005 Anderson & Garland were off again, this time to a purpose-built HQ and salerooms in Westerhope.

"We began to realise that the needs of a 21st Century international market could not be serviced from the inner-city listed building of Marlborough House," says Julian Thomson, an Anderson & Garland director and co-owner.

"We have moved from the fax machines at Marlborough House to the internet at Westerhope and it is the internet which has been a phenomenal boost to business."

Many people, of course, still turn up in person at the auctions. Others leave presale offers, or bid by telephone. But the internet has provided a worldwide reach, with 20,000 subscribers to the company's website www.andersonandgarland.com.

Its impact can be seen in the growth of the Chinese market, with Far Eastern bidders keen to buy back heritage pieces.

As well as four annual fine art sales, the company runs fortnightly "rummage" town and country sales which offer a range of modestly-priced items.

A new generation of buyers has also seen the staging of a couple of annual contemporary art and design sales. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.