Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

A Berry Good Show; Time to Enjoy the Colourful Fruits of Winter as Blossoms Pollinated Back in the Summer Finally Spring into Action

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

A Berry Good Show; Time to Enjoy the Colourful Fruits of Winter as Blossoms Pollinated Back in the Summer Finally Spring into Action

Article excerpt

Byline: With Diarmuid Gavin

AS we approach the end of the gardening year, there's still time to enjoy subtle garden colour coming into its own in winter... in the form of berries.

Blossoms pollinated in summer by insects have now transformed into bright fruits, genetically attractive so they will be noticed and consumed by birds.

It's all part of nature's way of propagating species and ensuring continuity. The birds will eat the fruit and then disperse the seeds in hopefully appropriate growing places through their waste, often intact.

Birds eat propagate This is a good example of plants and animals working hand in hand. However, before the birds get them, they offer great ornamental value to the gardener and there is a rainbow of colours that can delight those animals who appreciate gardens...

us!Red berries contrasting against dark green leaves are a sign of Christmas and its accompanying holly bushes. But for berries that will last longer, try Cotoneaster lacteus, a handsome shrub with arching branches and clusters of red berries.

With sufficient space, this is also a good choice for hedging. The more commonly planted Cotoneaster horizontalis with its almost flat, spreading branches covered in berries, is now invasive in the UK - unfortunately birds love these berries and spread them far and wide so avoid planting if you have a small plot.

berries and species With hollies, the key point to remember is that holly bushes are either male or female, but rarely both, so you need to have one of each in the garden to produce berries.

Many of the male varieties have lovely variegation such as Silver Queen, but despite its name, it is male and won't bear berries. Female varieties such as Golden King - yes, somebody was having fun with these names - need a male partner to produce berries.

Crataegus, our native hawthorn, is a good food source for thrushes and blackbirds and makes a delightful ornamental tree for the small garden. …

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