Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia)

PULLING UP PEGS CAMPERS VOW TO DITCH MOOLOOLABA AND TAKE MONEY WITH THEM Campers to Pack Up and Take Money with Them

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia)

PULLING UP PEGS CAMPERS VOW TO DITCH MOOLOOLABA AND TAKE MONEY WITH THEM Campers to Pack Up and Take Money with Them

Article excerpt

Byline: Sophie Meixner

PERFECT OUTLOOK: Louise Woods and Russell Muir enjoy the prized position of the Mooloolaba Caravan Park.

CAMPERS spending this summer in the soon-to-be-closed Mooloolaba Caravan Park say when the park is shut they will take their tourism dollars out of the Sunshine Coast - and even out of the state.

The impact will be felt by businesses, with campers telling the Sunshine Coast Sunday they each spend up to $2000 a week locally.

The park is marked for closure when its lease expires in June next year, following the adoption in December of a new council master plan for Mooloolaba which spelled an end for the facility in favour of more public space, a water park, a tidal rock pool, and parking options.

This was despite a petition in September attracting more than 2100 signatures and an impassioned campaign to get the caravan park heritage-listed.

Caravanners at the park yesterday said they were already looking at other camping sites - interstate.

MANY of the campers on the Mooloolaba waterfront said they would opt for northern New South Wales from now on, because it was still possible to camp where they could look out across the ocean.

Jon Erbacher, from Brisbane, said he had started visiting the Mooloolaba park as a baby, and 30 years later now took his own children to the same spot.

"We've already started looking at other places to go," he said.

"Caravan parks are an important part of the kids growing up.

"My family's been coming here for about 60 years.

"We'll go to another caravan park in northern NSW. There's still a few other caravan parks like this."

Mr Erbacher said the perception that campers didn't contribute to the local economy was untrue.

"When you're in a caravan you tend to get out a little more, whereas if you're holed up in a unit you tend to stay in," he said.

"You're not paying as much as you would if you were staying in a unit, so you go to the convenience store and get a coffee every morning. …

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