Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

I Would Have Retired 10 Times over If I Was Paid as Much as a Girl! as the All-New Series of Britain's Next Top Model Gets under Way on Lifetime, Head Judge and Supermodel Paul Sculfor Finds Time to Chat to GEMMA DUNN about His Two-Decade Career and Famous Exes

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

I Would Have Retired 10 Times over If I Was Paid as Much as a Girl! as the All-New Series of Britain's Next Top Model Gets under Way on Lifetime, Head Judge and Supermodel Paul Sculfor Finds Time to Chat to GEMMA DUNN about His Two-Decade Career and Famous Exes

Article excerpt

What can viewers expect from the latest series of Britain's Next Top Model? THE format is pretty similar, but what's better is there are now two head judges in Abbey Clancy and myself. With Nicky (Johnston) and Hilary (Alexander), there are four of us who are all currently working, with good careers and a lot of experience behind us, but we also have different opinions that sometimes conflict.

The show is not just focused on tasks and drama; it's more about showing the girls how the business works, what they have to do and are expected to do.

What are you looking for when an auditionee walks in? THERE'S something that happens when someone walks in the room, and you know it's either yes or no.

What we're looking for in a mechanical way is they have to have the right look, then they have to have the right personality and the professionalism or the keenness to learn what they have to do pretty quickly.

Also, can they actually do it? Because most people when they're put on set in front of a camera, freeze. It looks easy, but it's not, so we found out who could be going through pretty early on and who wouldn't.

Do you feel an affinity with the girls having spent two decades in the industry? YEAH, and that's been nice. I started in the same way - through a competition - and when you win something like that, you think, 'OK, this is it', but you get a rude awakening by finding out that you don't sit at home all day until a phone call comes in to say, 'Great, you've got this million pound job in the Bahamas; you're off tomorrow'.

You have to walk the streets to meet clients, go there, be measured, be looked at, be stared at, be criticised, and you'll probably get one job out of 10 - and that's if you're doing really well. It's really hard to get an agent in the first place, so there are lots of stages and steps before you get there, and when you do, that's when the work begins.

Could the show work in a male domain? ABSOLUTELY. They did try in America, but it didn't work because it was very cheesy and I don't believe a lot of people understand the men's business. It's not a camp, flamboyant kind of business; most of the guys in the world have spending capacity between the ages of 35-60, so it's quite serious in that high-end world.

Have you witnessed much change for men since you started? I GIGGLE to myself when I see things like the big policy in California about women getting paid the same as men, as I've always been paid less than women.

I would have retired 10 times over if I was a girl! There's a stigma attached and it's not very well known, but it has changed and the reason it's changed is because guys have changed in culture; a lot more men now wear body moisturiser, face moisturiser, tone and use hair products.

Back in the day, people liked builder-looking guys that were rugged and a bit messy, but now it's not really like that. …

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