Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Pat Killingsworth 1956-2016; Cancer Patient Wrote 4 Books, Encouraged Others He Outlived 5-Year Prognosis, Wrote 'Keep Smiling' in His Last Blog Post

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Pat Killingsworth 1956-2016; Cancer Patient Wrote 4 Books, Encouraged Others He Outlived 5-Year Prognosis, Wrote 'Keep Smiling' in His Last Blog Post

Article excerpt

Byline: Beth Reese Cravey

Pat Killingsworth, an Amelia Island man who had incurable bone cancer but wrote four books about the disease, traveled the country speaking to support groups and founded a three-day educational and social event for patients and caregivers, died Thursday on his 60th birthday.

His wife, Pattie, and other family members were by his side at Baptist Medical Center. His cancer was in remission but he succumbed to complications from treatment, according to family friends.

Monday Mr. Killingsworth wrote of his failing health in his last post on his blog, "Living with Multiple Myeloma." The post was titled, "I'm not dead yet!"

"Honestly, I am in pretty bad shape," he wrote. Still, even then, he encouraged other patients. "Feel good and keep smiling," he wrote.

Born in Wisconsin, Mr. Killingsworth was a real estate agent in 2007 when we was diagnosed with multiple myeloma at age 51. He was told he had no more than five years to live.

"That's young for a multiple myeloma patient. No one was looking for it, so I suffered a lot of bone damage before my doctors could figure out what was going on," he told the Times-Union in 2015. "I was devastated. ... It took me five or six months to get my bearings."

Mr. Killingsworth was in remission for three years, with the help of a new oral chemotherapy. After a relapse, he underwent an unsuccessful stem cell transplant, followed by a combination of drugs that helped keep the disease under control. He said in 2015 that he took a drug that was not even federally approved when he was first diagnosed.

He suffered from intermittent pain and side effects from chemotherapy. Yet he walked, swam and lifted light weights. And he became one of the multiple myeloma community's "best-known patient voices," according to The Myeloma Beacon, an online news site for the community where Mr. …

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