Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Nabila Is about to Give Birth -- and Lose Her Home; Makeshift Homes, Schools, Cafes, Mosques and Churches in the Calais 'Jungle' Migrant Camp Are to Be Demolished in the Next 48 Hours. David Churchill Met Families Facing an Uncertain Future as the Bulldozers Prepare to Move In

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Nabila Is about to Give Birth -- and Lose Her Home; Makeshift Homes, Schools, Cafes, Mosques and Churches in the Calais 'Jungle' Migrant Camp Are to Be Demolished in the Next 48 Hours. David Churchill Met Families Facing an Uncertain Future as the Bulldozers Prepare to Move In

Article excerpt

Byline: David Churchill

EIGHT months pregnant and clutching her back in pain from the Taliban bullet lodged near her spine, Nabila Nikzay tells of her fear about giving birth with her home only days from demolition.

The ramshackle caravan where she lives with husband, Nazir, 20, is one of about 143 set to be bulldozed by the French authorities at the "Jungle" migrant camp in Calais on Wednesday.

"We don't know what will happen to us, or with the delivery of the baby," said Mrs Nikzay, 20, who will be forced to give birth to her boy in the camp's makeshift medical centre. "I'm scared about the future and I feel scared here -- it's not a good place to live. We are feeling very uncomfortable here.

"We have problems with getting food and clothes but we don't know what to do. We want to come to a country like the UK as soon as possible."

Mrs Nikzay and her husband fled their native Afghanistan after the Taliban regained control of their neighbourhood when the US pulled out of the war-torn region. The militants shot her and her brother, suspecting they had aided the Americans.

The Nikzays came to the camp three and a half months ago after walking long stretches and travelling by coach for six weeks through Iran, Turkey, Greece, Serbia and Macedonia before reaching Europe. Their only hope of keeping their makeshift home is if a judge halts the planned demolition. After a visit to the camp to reassess the situation, a court case will be held in Lille and a ruling handed down tomorrow.

The planned demolition of the southern part of the camp will lead to as many as 3,000 people -- from a total population of about 5,000 -- having their homes flattened, according to charities.

The area makes up about two thirds of the camp. Along with around 143 caravans, about 1,200 shelters -- makeshift wood and plastic huts -- are set to be razed.

According to a census taken on the ground by charity Help Refugees, about 400 of those affected by the demolition are children aged 10 to 17. Around 300 are unaccompanied.

Citizens UK says the situation is not fair on young children with no parents. …

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