Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Time Counts When Planning for a City; Making the Right Moves to Create Liveable Communities

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Time Counts When Planning for a City; Making the Right Moves to Create Liveable Communities

Article excerpt

Byline: Erle Levey

THE closer people live to a city and the better those places are able to function means more productive lives. Not just in an economic sense but in better quality of life ... less time spent travelling provides valued leisure/educational opportunities.

Among the best, most liveable major cities are New York and London that are planned with green spaces at the heart and parkland for well-being as well as recreation.

Adelaide is typical of a designed centre, surrounded by parkland and within each quadrant of the CBD block sits extra parkland. Then there's Victoria Square, that green haven at city's heart.

Melbourne is looking at creating 30ha more green space in the city, something that would have taken millions of dollars to buy back. City planners are doing it by looking at things differently, creatively. By utilising existing open space more efficiently, creating wider and more usable footpaths, providing grass verges and sedges for first-catch of storm water.

It's the same with getting around our streets. In school holidays about 10% fewer cars are on the roads and people wish it could be like that for more of the time.

Well it can. Better use of public transport, walking and cycling paths, car-sharing can make an immediate impact.

The next step looks like driverless cars. People-moving vehicles powered by battery and which no-one needs to own meaning fewer cars on the roads.

The new Maroochydore central business district has been named as a blueprint for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's 30-minute cities plan.

The problem is getting the funding of infrastructure for regional centres such as the Sunshine Coast to turn the vision into reality.

The plan recognises the significant impact of congestion, as people from outer regions are forced to travel to large cities for employment, schooling and health services. …

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