Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia)

Painted by Wordsworth; Poet's Spirit Echoes on the Rolling Greens of Lake District That He Gave to the World

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia)

Painted by Wordsworth; Poet's Spirit Echoes on the Rolling Greens of Lake District That He Gave to the World

Article excerpt

Byline: JOHN NEWTON

THE poetry of Wordsworth has brought the English Lake District into the lives and minds of people everywhere.

Inspired by the epic grandeur of the Lakes, The Daffodils is one of the most famous poems in the English language.

It was composed in 1804, two years after Wordsworth saw the sublime yellow flowers while walking by Lake Ullswater.

Today, visitors flock to the Lake District in spring to see the daffodils - and there are masses in every field and hedge row.

The great Lakeland poet was born at Wordsworth House in the Cumbrian town of Cockermouth in a fine Georgian house, built to impress.

Its grand scale would have made quite an impact on the locals when it was first built at the end of the 17th century.

It's now owned by the National Trust, which protects and opens to the public more than 300 historic houses and gardens in Britain.

A little gem of a town, Cockermouth was almost wiped out in November last year when devastating floods caused catastrophic damage.

All shops in the main street were closed - some businesses for more than six months, including the four-star Trout Hotel (circa 1670), which had a damage bill of more than $5 million.

Near the bustling market town of Penrith, the Lowther family has eight kilometres of salmon and trout fishing on the River Eden.

The northern Lakeland retreat has its roots in the past.

On December 18, 1745, a pitched battle raged on Clifton Moor - the last time two armies clashed on English soil when the Duke of Cumberland's forces overwhelmed Bonnie Prince Charlie's retreating Jacobite rebels. According to Charles Lowther, fourth son of the late 7th Earl of Lonsdale, whose family introduced the Lonsdale Belt for boxing, the battle took place near Lowther Park and Lowther Hall, which remains the seat of the Lonsdale family today.

The Lowther family, which has owned the surrounding country estate for centuries, later discovered that 12 Scottish rebels were buried in the backyard of the George and Dragon, a former rundown 18th century Georgian coaching inn that Charles bought and turned into an award-winning pub and restaurant with upmarket accommodation. …

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