Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Garden Design as Important as House Design; Gardens Are a Great Place for Relaxing, for Entertaining and Relieving Stress, Whether You're Admiring Them or Working in Them. A Cared-For Garden Also Adds to the Appearance and Potentially Value of a Property, Says Architect Neil Turner

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Garden Design as Important as House Design; Gardens Are a Great Place for Relaxing, for Entertaining and Relieving Stress, Whether You're Admiring Them or Working in Them. A Cared-For Garden Also Adds to the Appearance and Potentially Value of a Property, Says Architect Neil Turner

Article excerpt

I WAS prompted to write this month's column while I was reading a wonderful book about meadows and the beautiful natural flowers that can grow in our gardens.

The book in question is Wild Flowers, by Dr George Proud a former medical consultant at Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary.

In this country there has been a tradition of landscape architects from Capability Brown to Gertrude Jekyll through to modern landscape designers working up grand visions.

As an architect, I love well-designed formal gardens, that both enhance and add to the design of a lovely house. The lines and symmetry that can be applied to a garden can mirror that of a house design, subtly bringing the two together, not to mention adding kerb appeal.

At this time of year, both Chelsea and Hampton Court flower shows inspire us with their carefully-designed masterpieces and the many examples of how to create a variety of large and small gardens.

Often on TV we now see programmes which show where architecture, interior design and garden design cross over.

So, should you plan a formal garden with neat colour co-ordinated borders and colour matched furniture, or go a bit wilder with something more natural? Walt Disney of Mickey Mouse fame once said: "I don't like formal gardens. I like wild nature. It's just the wilderness instinct in me, I guess."

So, a bit like Walt I've decided to go au naturel and give over half my garden to a meadow. My hope is that, within a couple of years I will have long meadow grass full of a variety of plants differing in colours and styles.

Simply by removing the formal grass and seeding with the correct mix of wildflowers we will have a colourful maintenance free garden, which only requires a strim at the end of the season.

Already this year the meadow grass is growing and my wife and I are trying to work out what is starting to appear. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.