Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

This Year's Dahling Buds; THE CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW IS A LAUNCHPAD FOR MANY GORGEOUS NEW PLANTS AND FLOWERS

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

This Year's Dahling Buds; THE CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW IS A LAUNCHPAD FOR MANY GORGEOUS NEW PLANTS AND FLOWERS

Article excerpt

Byline: YOUR GARDEN With Diarmuid Gavin

EVERY year at the Chelsea Flower Show The Great Pavilion is packed to the rafters with fantastic flowers. Magnificent displays of iris, begonia, gladioli, clematis, peonies and chrysanthemum show off these blooms at their peak and in perfect condition.

And each year new plants are launched by breeders hoping to catch the public's affection.

The RHS panel of plant experts judge these and a single new introduction is chosen as the RHS Chelsea Flower Show Plant of the Year, taking into account innovation, excellence, impact and appeal.

Past winners have included the very popular Anemone 'Wild Swan' and Geranium 'Rozanne', which won Plant of the Centenary - a wonderfully useful blue-flowered hardy geranium which is easy to grow and keeps flowering all summer long.

This year, as usual, there were some choice entries which I'm sure will find their way into our gardens over the next few years.

David Austin Roses had a delicious new rose called 'Roald Dahl', celebrating the centenary of the author's birth.

It's a free-flowering rose with fragrant peachy flowers from orange-red buds and is described as very robust. The peach colour is a tribute to Roald's first major literary success with James and the Giant Peach, and a percentage of sales will go to the Roald Dahl's Marvellous Children's Charity, which helps seriously-ill children.

Clematis from Taylors Now there's a new geum on the block, courtesy of Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants. We are all familiar by now with the zingy orange geum 'Totally Tangerine'. This new variety is 'Scarlet Tempest' in a big, bold shade of red.

Geums probably don't get the credit they deserve - I have one in my garden that started blooming in early May and will keep going till September. They're not fussy and have a lovely airy texture to them as the red flowers are held on top of long stems, so you can put them at the front or middle of a border without them blocking out the view of other plants. …

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