Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

It's So Stressful Watching My Boys Play -- This Year I Will Try to Enjoy It; Judy Murray Talks of the Agonies She Goes through When Sons, Andy and Jamie, Step onto the Court at SW19

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

It's So Stressful Watching My Boys Play -- This Year I Will Try to Enjoy It; Judy Murray Talks of the Agonies She Goes through When Sons, Andy and Jamie, Step onto the Court at SW19

Article excerpt

Byline: Chris Jones at Wimbledon EXCLUSIVE

JUDY MURRAY has cut down her commitments at Wimbledon this year to try to limit the stress that envelops her during the most famous Championships in the sport.

However, with eldest son Jamie the Australian Open doubles champion and world No2 Andy in action, there seems little chance of the former Fed Cup captain blending into the background.

With the potential that both her boys could be Grand Slam winners at Wimbledon again -- Jamie won the mixed doubles in 2007 and Andy lifted the men's trophy (below) six years later -- Judy is braced again for two weeks of intense scrutiny.

"I find Wimbledon stressful with so much going on and now that I am not doing the Fed Cup role, I don't have any duties in terms of watching the British girls, or any commentary," explained Judy, speaking at an HSBC Road to Wimbledon tennis tournament in Sussex.

"I am really trying to ensure I am not jumping from one court to another. It is stressful because of the expectation on the boys and Andy in particular, and the spotlight is on the whole family during the Championships. I would like to enjoy it more as I used to in the early days."

With Ivan Lendl now back on Andy's coaching team after a twoyear break, Judy knows there will be plenty of bad jokes to take her mind off the on-court drama. While, Lendl is stony-faced court side, he is very different away from the cameras.

Last week Lendl rejoined Team Murray for the Aegon Championships at Queen's where Andy created history by winning a fifth title and Judy discovered that the coach's sense of fun had not changed.

She explained: "Ivan has his own very unique sense of humour. He said to me at Queen's, "Judy, when did you get here?" and I said it was last night. He then asked how I travelled down and I replied that I had flown down and his reply was, "on your broomstick!" I walked straight into that and it is what I have to put up with now that Ivan is back. I've always enjoyed having Ivan around."

What Lendl brings is an ability to stop her youngest son mentally imploding in big matches. During their previous two years together, Andy's on-court persona changed, out went the rants at his own coaches and the public demonstrations of intense frustration. Judy is confident Lendl will have a similar effect again. While Andy has been constantly in the spotlight, Jamie has steadily worked his way up the doubles game and while the 30-year-old could brag about being the first Murray to win a Grand Slam and also become No1 in the rankings, that is not his style. Jamie dealt with his own issues by working with Dr John Mathers, a sports psychologist at Stirling University.

Judy explained: "When Jamie was younger he would get very frustrated because he is a perfectionist and if he hit 100 shots and 99 were good and one was rubbish he would focus on the bad one. …

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