Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Moving WW1 Painting Given Permanent Home; A Painting Inspired by a Famous War Memorial Has Found a New Home, as DAVID WHETSTONE Reports

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Moving WW1 Painting Given Permanent Home; A Painting Inspired by a Famous War Memorial Has Found a New Home, as DAVID WHETSTONE Reports

Article excerpt

>Artist Andy Farr with his painting, The Response AN artist's moving and timely twist on one of Newcastle's most celebrated landmarks is to find a permanent home in the city, thanks to the lord mayor.

Andy Farr's painting, The Response, was inspired by the war memorial of the same name which stands near the Civic Centre.

The so-called Renwick memorial, commissioned by businessman Sir George Renwick and unveiled on July 5, 1923 by the Prince of Wales, commemorates the raising of several battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers during the First World War.

The Andy Farr painting shows two children in 21st-century dress embracing, and in one case being embraced by, the soldiers in the memorial as they march off to war.

The painting, done on three wooden boards and measuring nine feet by five feet, was unveiled last year at an event organised by Newcastle Libraries to mark the unveiling of a memorial to 16th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers - the so-called Newcastle Battalion - at a church in the French village of Authuille.

Andy Farr had approached Fiona Hill at Newcastle City Library to ask if the city would like to exhibit the painting. It was then transported to the North East from Andy's home in Leamington Spa.

After its unveiling in September it was put on show at the City Library, where it was admired by staff members and many visitors, including Coun Richardson, now lord mayor.

So keen was she to have the painting exhibited permanently in Newcastle that she bought it and has given it to Newcastle Libraries on long-term loan.

At a special handover ceremony at the Civic Centre, the lord mayor described Andy Farr's painting as "incredibly poignant and emotional" and "truly inspired".

As she explained that she found it hard to look at it without becoming emotional, she wiped away a tear. …

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