Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Motor Sport Boring? Ridiculous; A Weekend Crammed with Incredible and Controversial Racing Shows How Great the Sport Can Be

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Motor Sport Boring? Ridiculous; A Weekend Crammed with Incredible and Controversial Racing Shows How Great the Sport Can Be

Article excerpt

Byline: Iain Curry

THE Monaco Grand Prix, Indianapolis 500 and Nurburgring 24 Hours all on the same weekend. For armchair motor sport enthusiasts, myself included, a rugged-up spot in front of the television was a happy place to be from last Saturday.

Modern motor sport is oft criticised for processional races, dull cars and soulless circuits, but last weekend held two fingers up to such negatives as we were treated to some superb racing and good ol' controversy at some fo the world's most iconic circuits, with plenty of Aussie interest thrown in.

I shudder to think how many eyes missed such motor sport treats while drowning in a sea of NRL and AFL coverage across free-to-air and pay TV, but for those avoiding the football (or hand egg, as it should be known), high octane excitement was more accessible than usual for motor sport enthusiasts.

Blessedly, Channel Ten had the showpiece Monte Carlo F1 race action live (as it does 10 of the 21 Grands Prix this season), the Nurburgring 24 Hours was on free live stream on the internet with excellent commentary in English, while Foxtel subscribers enjoyed the Indy 500 in the early hours of Monday.

For those watching the F1 qualifying and then race, it was a coming-of-age weekend for Aussie ace Daniel Ricciardo around the wealthy streets of Monaco.

He was cruelly robbed of certain victory by a botched pit stop where his Red Bull team didn't have his tyres ready in time, but despite the heartache, the Perth-born racer was sublime to secure pole position in the dry, build a commanding lead in a wet race, then prove faster and fairer than eventual race winner Lewis Hamilton as he tried to wrestle back first place. Perhaps most importantly, Ricciardo showed Red Bull and the rest of the F1 paddock (we know you're interested, Ferrari) that he truly is World Champion material: give him a winning car and he'll be our first F1 champ since Alan Jones in 1980. …

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