Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Take a Look outside before Winter Blasts; in the Final of His Three Columns on Property Maintenance, Surveyor Chris Scott Takes a Look at External Decoration

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Take a Look outside before Winter Blasts; in the Final of His Three Columns on Property Maintenance, Surveyor Chris Scott Takes a Look at External Decoration

Article excerpt

IT might sound a bit of a cliche, but decorating a home can be a bit like the painting of the Forth Rail Bridge - but hopefully using less paint.

We've been enjoying some decent weather over the past few weeks so now is as good a time as any to tackle those outside jobs, particularly external decoration.

A good starting point is to inspect the external components of your property that have previously been painted and try to gauge what condition they're in.

If you don't feel confident doing this yourself then ask the opinion of a trustworthy painter and decorator who will be able to advise you on whether or not you should be making the investment now, or holding off for a few years.

People often ignore external decoration, possibly because we seem to be more focused on how the interior looks, which I guess is where we spend most of our time.

It might also be because some components are difficult to see from ground level, such as high level windows, gutters and soffit boards, making it more difficult to assess their condition.

Whilst inspecting your property, look out for signs of deterioration to the painted items, such as flaked paintwork, bare wood and signs of decay to timber components.

Orange staining and corrosion to metal items, such as railings, cast iron rainwater goods and drainage pipes would suggest they are in need of some TLC.

If your property is rendered with a paint finish, then it is quite common for the paintwork to discolour and deteriorate if it is left for long periods without regular maintenance.

If you're tackling the work yourself, invest time in the preparation of the surface you are about to paint, otherwise you'll find yourself doing it all again this time next year, which is not only a waste of your time it will prove costly.

Whatever you are painting, make sure any defective paint is thoroughly removed and the surface left clean and dry before applying the preparatory paint. …

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