Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

You Want a You Say; the Sixties Was the Decade That Changed the World. Turn Up, Turn on and Tune in at a Fascinating Exhibition Opening Next Week at the V&A. by Corinne Julius

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

You Want a You Say; the Sixties Was the Decade That Changed the World. Turn Up, Turn on and Tune in at a Fascinating Exhibition Opening Next Week at the V&A. by Corinne Julius

Article excerpt

Byline: Corinne Julius

COULD there possibly be anything left to say about the Sixties? It's an era that still has plenty to teach us, insists Victoria Broackes, co-curator of You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970, the new autumn show at the Victoria & Albert Museum in South Kensington.

"The people who were active then are still around," she says. "We wanted to bring the V&A's ability to provide cultural context and the creative process to bear on one of the most exciting contemporary periods, when the world opened up for ordinary people.

"In the words of the Beatles' 1968 song, Revolution, 'You say you want a revolution. Well, you know. We all want to change the world' -- and for nearly everyone the world did change."

The show features music, fashion, design products, furniture, architecture and graphics to illustrate what the curators call "six revolutions in 1,826 days" -- covering the five years from 1966 to 1970. "Revolutions in identity, the head, on the street, in consuming, in gathering and in communicating," says Broakes.

THE SWINGING CITY The show recreates a mix of Carnaby Street with a hint of King's Road to show what, in 1966, Time Magazine dubbed "The Swinging City." The Sixties opened up society; customs and values were challenged, by young people from different social classes. There was full employment. Many had disposable income and credit cards for the first time. The young bought fashion and music, spawning new art and design.

Artworks by Bridget Riley and Richard Hamilton feature in the show, alongside clothes from Biba, Mary Quant, Mr Fish and Granny Takes a Trip. There are costumes designed for Mick Jagger and Sandie Shaw, photography of musicians of the day, their music and clips from the 1966 films Blow Up and Alfie.

This world of experimentation with music, drugs and counterculture is looked at in an evocation of London's UFO club, where live music combined with avant-garde film, and Pink Floyd was the house band. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.