Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Learn the Secrets; This Is London Theatre at Its Finest, but All Will Not Be Revealed

Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Learn the Secrets; This Is London Theatre at Its Finest, but All Will Not Be Revealed

Article excerpt

Byline: TRAVEL Louise O'Mara

ABOUT THE THEATRE:

The Palace Theatre is between Charing Cross Rd and Shaftesbury Ave and it is a large, red-brick structure that stands out among most other buildings. It has a capacity of 1400 seats spread across four levels. The theatre is one of the larger venues on the West End.

Built in 1891, the building was designed by Thomas Edward Collcutt.

KEEP the secrets.

That is what we are told after seeing Harry Potter and the Cursed Child live at the Palace Theatre in London.

That makes it hard to do a review, but the good news is that the script version has been out now for a couple of months, so I can actually write something more than "wow" - although initially that was all I could think of for about a week.

So if you haven't read the script, haven't apparated to London and you don't want too many spoilers, this is my final warning.

The play is held in two parts and it is better to see on the same day rather than consecutive evenings.

There is so much excitement in the air when you arrive clutching those tickets and I was able to score amazing seats in the first row of the first balcony. They are said to be the best in the theatre, but only if you have short legs like me (sorry husband).

Part one picks up where the seventh book left off and is centred on an older Harry Potter who is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic and is struggling as a father of three school-age children. We rush through the first few years of middle child Albus's years at Hogwarts and while it feels a bit jarring, it is a nice way to get right into the action.

Much has already been written about the plot, so I won't go into that. People either love or hate the script. But everyone who sees the play adores it. This is a telling sign. It means that while there are certainly issues, everything can be forgiven with amazing actors, a truly wonderful set and real-life magic before your eyes. …

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