Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Scare Tactics; as Mums and Dads Get Their Little Monsters Ready for Halloween, Kristen Harding Offers Top Tips for Safe Trick or Treating

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Scare Tactics; as Mums and Dads Get Their Little Monsters Ready for Halloween, Kristen Harding Offers Top Tips for Safe Trick or Treating

Article excerpt

Byline: ROB KENNEDY

DECIDING whether they want to be a werewolf, a zombie or a witch might be all the little ones need to think about this Halloween, but for parents there are bigger concerns when it comes to trick or treating.

Here, Kristen Harding, a childcare expert at Tinies (tinies.com), one of the UK's leading childcare agencies offers some tips: 1 CONSIDER YOUR COSTUMES TAKE your child's, age, size and physical abilities into account when choosing a costume. For younger children, keep it simple and remember to make sure any attachments are well secured. If you purchase a costume you may want to remove small pieces as they could be choke hazards.

2 AVOID SUGAR OVERLOAD HAVING a limit of how many sweets are allowed to be consumed on the night and on the days immediately afterwards will mean the kids' Halloween haul will last longer, while the sugar highs and lows are kept to a minimum.

Suggest that you hold on to the majority of their loot and let them carry a smaller container.

3 KEEP GROUP SIZES SMALL IT can be fun to go out with a few children, but remember how intimidating a large group of kids can be. Limiting groups to five children or less means the person at the door will be less overwhelmed and you can still keep your eye on all of them.

4 MIND YOUR MANNERS UNFORTUNATELY children don't always remember to say thank you, and Halloween is no different, whether it's because they are shy or caught up in the moment - it's still not OK!

Grabby hands can make people unlikely to offer sweets again next year. Be sure to address politeness before you head out and don't be afraid to remind them to say thank you - eventually it will sink in.

5 STRESS STRANGER DANGER ALL year we tell children not to talk to strangers and then, for this one night of the year, we encourage them to go to strange homes and knock on the doors.

This means we need to set boundaries beforehand without scaring them. Reminding them never to enter a stranger's home and making sure you are always only a few steps away can help this. …

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