Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Body Languages Reveal the Truth of Election Race; BODY Language Experts ALLAN and BARBARA PEASE, Authors of the Definitive Book of Body Language, Look at the Body Language of US Election Candidates Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump and Explain What It Means in the Race for the White House

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Body Languages Reveal the Truth of Election Race; BODY Language Experts ALLAN and BARBARA PEASE, Authors of the Definitive Book of Body Language, Look at the Body Language of US Election Candidates Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump and Explain What It Means in the Race for the White House

Article excerpt

AS body language researchers and authors, it's been interesting to watch the performances of Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton during the US election debates.

In fact, what we were actually watching was, in fact, a performance with the intention of the candidates to make an emotional impact on their audience.

And because body language accounts for 60-80% of how we feel about each of the candidates -- it reveals how someone feels and impacts on how we receive their messages -- it is the most telling part of Trump/Clinton encounters.

That's why few viewers have any idea about the policies of each candidate but we are all clear on the attitudes they hold toward each other and to others.

The candidates have been distinctly different in their body language displays, largely due to their individual past experiences.

Most high-profile politicians employ body language consultants (like us) to give themselves the best chance of coming across convincingly.

Hillary Clinton, however, is a veteran of debating and of being persuasive compared to the less experienced Trump, who uses a limited range of repetitive, blunt, in-your-face gestures to make his points.

This is why Trump is more interesting to watch than Clinton, because he telegraphs to us what he thinks and feels before he says it.

In their debates, Trump has come across as an arrogant bully to Clinton.

She has beautifully played the role of a woman being attacked by a tough guy.

Clinton is so experienced and polished at public appearance that it's hard to know what she really thinks or feels versus which part is "showbiz".

Overall, Clinton was calmer at the lectern during the debates and used her hands expressively when she spoke.

She made good eye contact with both the live and viewing audience and the moderator and was much more forceful than Trump both in the tone of her voice and her vocal emphasis.

She was more physically reserved in the first two debates but picked up her perceived authority in the last debate where she was quicker to respond, her tone was sharper and she gestured at Trump more than in the previous debates, which conveyed a sense of power.

She talked over Trump at times and continued to talk when the moderator was trying to rein her in, but even this gave her more power than the previous debates where she was seen as too self-contained.

When she used more rehearsed answers, her eyes dropped down and she lost her connection with the audience and the cameras.

She held much more eye contact with the audience than Trump who looked more at the moderators than the audience, making them feel that he was disconnected and that they were remotely watching an argument.

Clinton uses a range of facial expressions including hurt, amazement, disgust, astonishment and disbelief to fend off Trump's attacks. …

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