Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

OH I DO LIKE TO BE BESIDE THE SEASIDE... WAYNE ANKERS Takes His Family to a Wet, but Wonderful, Wales

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

OH I DO LIKE TO BE BESIDE THE SEASIDE... WAYNE ANKERS Takes His Family to a Wet, but Wonderful, Wales

Article excerpt

HE rain was absolutely torrential.

TDetermined not to let the weather spoil our short getaway, in heavy downpours and gale-force winds we staggered along the deserted promenade and even took a brief stroll on the beach.

But our wet woes were soon washed away as we headed towards the town centre, immediately struck by the awesome sight of St John's Church nestled into the mountainside.

This magnificent piece of architecture overlooking Barmouth was simply stunning and one of many reasons we fell in love with this small town on the West coast of Snowdonia, despite being drenched for most of our stay.

It's difficult to imagine an urban area of Britain having a pleasant appearance in these conditions but, in spite of the storms, this particular seaside town still looked beautiful. The long sandy beach seemed to beckon us regardless and it wasn't too difficult to imagine how perfect a place it would be to soak up the sun on a summer's afternoon.

The harbour and main street were picturesque, quaint and blessed with dozens of independent shops.

And then there was the Last Inn, one of Wales' most famous pubs which dates back to the 15th Century and was originally home to a shoemaker.

It is positioned on the edge of the town overlooked by the stunning Barmouth bridge which spans the Mawddach estuary.

The pub is packed with character, timber beams, open fireplaces and a fresh spring water pond which backs on to a wall that is actually the side of the mountain.

With such a charming setting, it was no surprise to discover that the food offered at the Last Inn is delicious and they serve a number of ales to help pass a wet winter's afternoon.

But by far the highlight of Barmouth is St John's Church.

Set back from the main street, it is a short walk up a winding road before you arrive at this astonishing architectural gem. Due to growing numbers of parishioners in the town in the late 1800s it was decided a new church was needed. There was no land available and no room to expand the existing church, so St John's was built on a rocky precipice above the town, making it the incredible imposing structure it still is today, with even more beauty inside. …

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