Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Pastoral Past Revealed; in Her Second Book Focusing on the Felling Area of Gateshead, Historian ANTHEA LANG Takes a Closer Look at Heworth, Felling and Windy Nook

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Pastoral Past Revealed; in Her Second Book Focusing on the Felling Area of Gateshead, Historian ANTHEA LANG Takes a Closer Look at Heworth, Felling and Windy Nook

Article excerpt

Byline: ANTHEA LANG

WE stop offon the eastern edge of Gateshead as local author and historian Anthea Lang continues to explore the rich heritage of Gateshead with her new book on the three communities of Heworth, Felling and Windy Nook.

Anthea said: "This book follows on from Memories of Felling, published last year. This new book not only revisits Felling but also takes a look at Heworth and Windy Nook as well.

"As with my previous book, it is not a chronological or a comprehensive history but tries to show how changes, some chosen, some forced, impacted on the lives of people - portrayed here through the use of postcards, photographs and advertisements.

"Think of Heworth today and many people will immediately think of a large traffic roundabout, but in earlier times Heworth had a very different appearance. This was a rural landscape - fields, pastures and streams - and its name comes from 'heah' and 'worth' which literally means a high enclosure around a field.

"There were three distinct areas: Heworth Shore beside the river; Nether Heworth around St Mary's Church; and High Heworth, which became the colliery area alongside Windy Nook.

"In medieval times, residents fished at Heworth Shore, with its valleys, streams, burns and woodland but, by the late 18th century, this green and pleasant land had been replaced by an industrial landscape, populated by bleach fields, potteries and colour works.

"It became a poor area and, at Cuthbertson's brewery here in 1783, there is a record of a fat ox being killed and divided between about 50 poor people. Each received seven pounds of beef, one 6d loaf and a gallon of beer 'to their great relief at this season, when every necessary of Turn to Page 24 From Page 23 life is so dear'." Anthea continued: "The small area of Windy Nook has a full and interesting history populated with stories of heroism, philanthropy, sporting exploits and even murders.

"Although the basic layout of a village at a crossroads remains today, there is now very little trace of its earlier appearance and the people who lived here 100 years ago. Windy Nook is well named, as its hilly location at a crossroads ensures that it is often a very windy spot! …

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