Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Let's Rustle Up the BRUSSELS; IT'S THE VEG WE EITHER LOVE OR HATE, BUT AS THE FESTIVE SEASON APPROACHES IT'S TIME TO

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Let's Rustle Up the BRUSSELS; IT'S THE VEG WE EITHER LOVE OR HATE, BUT AS THE FESTIVE SEASON APPROACHES IT'S TIME TO

Article excerpt

THERE'S no other veg that shouts Christmas as much as Brussels sprouts. Whether you love them or hate them, no Christmas feast is complete without them.

But it is the veg that divides the nation. I have to come clean - I like them occasionally. Some years ago I appeared on Come Dine With Me's Christmas special and when faced with my belligerent group of dinner guests, some of whom were definitely haters (of sprouts, of course!) I managed to convert them by stir-frying them in a wok.

And although it is part of the larger cabbage family, it's not really a mini form of it. The head doesn't emerge from the ground - the sprout is an edible bud that grows between stems up the stalk of the plant. But like cabbage, it is a great winter crop providing excellent nutrition and loads of vitamins at a time of the year when the veg plot isn't producing much. If you'd like to cultivate your own for next Christmas, you could start planning now and order some seed for spring sowing.

Like any veg plucked fresh from the garden, it will taste better than the ones in the shops, and there are some interesting varieties available such as red-coloured ones. You don't have to grow loads either - one plant can yield as much as 2lb.

Start by choosing a sunny spot for your veg - you want about six hours of sunlight a day. Prepare the site now by digging over, removing weeds and stones and adding garden compost and/or wellrotted manure. Sow seeds thinly in later March/early April in seed trays and transplant to their final growing position when they are 6in high.

Plant in firmly, leaving a couple of feet between each plant. This will allow for good air circulation and discourage fungal diseases. Taller varieties need staking as they grow. Keep watered during the growing season and also throughout dry spells. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.