Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

'She's Putting Your Jobs at Risk' LIB DEM LEADER ATTACKS MAY OVER 'RECKLESS' BREXIT PLAN

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

'She's Putting Your Jobs at Risk' LIB DEM LEADER ATTACKS MAY OVER 'RECKLESS' BREXIT PLAN

Article excerpt

Byline: JONATHAN WALKER Political Editor jon.walker@trinitymirror.com @jonwalker121

Theresa May and Tim Farron LIB Dems leader Tim Farron accused Theresa May of risking North East jobs with her hard Brexit strategy.

Mr Farron claimed the "reckless" scheme would put North East exports at risk.

It follows Mrs May's speech this week, in which she said the UK would leave the EU Single Market but instead "seek the greatest possible access to it through a new, comprehensive, bold and ambitious Free Trade Agreement".

Mr Farron said: "Over half of all exports from Newcastle and the North East go to the Single Market.

"This Conservative government's reckless plans to leave the Single Market would put the success of our proud manufacturing industries at risk.

"Many people who voted Leave wanted to stay in the common market. Now Theresa May has thrown this possibility out of the window, before negotiations have even begun."

Brexit dominated debate at Westminster as Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson came under fire for appearing to accuse EU leaders of considering Nazi-style "punishment beatings" on Britain in revenge for Brexit. Referring to French president Francois Hollande, he said during a visit to India: "If Mr Hollande wants to administer punishment beatings to anybody who seeks to escape, in the manner of some World War Two movie, I don't think that is the way forward, and it's not in the interests of our friends and partners."

Downing Street insisted that he wasn't comparing anyone to a Nazi.

As the implications of Mrs May's speech sunk in, it was reported that she planned to call an election if her agreement with the EU was rejected.

The Prime Minister has promised that Parliament will get the chance to vote on the UK's deal with the EU once negotiations have taken place, but it is unclear exactly what will happen if she loses the vote, which is not likely to take place for at least a year. Reaction in other parts of the EU was mixed. European Council president Donald Tusk praised Mrs May, comparing her to Sir Winston Churchill in her "warm" support for a successful European Union after she said the UK still wanted to see the EU succeed. …

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