Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Bradley to Star in Ad Campaign; CANCER-BATTLING BOY TO FEATURE IN TV ADVERT FOR AWARENESS WEEK

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Bradley to Star in Ad Campaign; CANCER-BATTLING BOY TO FEATURE IN TV ADVERT FOR AWARENESS WEEK

Article excerpt

Byline: BARBARA HODGSON Reporter barbara.hodgson@ncjmedia.com @BarbaraHodgson5

HE'S already inspiring people around the globe and now Bradley Lowery has been picked to front a World Cancer Day campaign.

The five-year-old favourite will star in a TV advert for his home crowd, encouraging the North East to unite in the battle against cancer.

Bradley, who is terminally ill with neuroblastoma, features alongside other young sufferers in the advert by Cancer Research UK to coincide with the global awareness-raising day.

The charity is asking people to buy a special Unity Band to show their support and to raise money for research into life-saving cancer care.

Bradley, from Blackhall Colliery in County Durham, is currently undergoing treatment in hospital which his parents Gemma and Carl hope will prolong his life.

His family's regular updates on his Facebook page reveal his painful struggles against the disease but his ready smile, which never seems far away, has won him admirers worldwide.

Gemma said that her son is due to have scans at the end of two rounds of his costly new treatment to see if it is working.

Due to its expense - 12 rounds would cost around PS500,000 - the family are continuing their fundraising efforts which were initially intended to finance pioneering therapy for Bradley in America.

While the side-effects of his chemotherapy have been causing him problems, the hope is that the endresult will bring more hope.

And the family have no longer ruled out a visit to the States to seek help.

Gemma said: "As a mammy I'm thinking positive; hope is all I have left."

While it is an effort to keep fighting without knowing what the outcome will be, she said that anything is better than the two months doctors originally gave her son if they chose to stop treatment altogether.

"Since then he has radiotherapy which his doctor thinks could give him at least six months, which is amazing," she added.

"I would like to hope, if it does work, there is still a possibility I will get him to America to get the treatment that it is believed would prevent the cancer coming back. …

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