Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Next Season's Fashion Colour Tip? Pepto-Bismol Pink; in the Latest in His Series on Striking Images, Our Columnist Looks at How We Are Influenced by Colour

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Next Season's Fashion Colour Tip? Pepto-Bismol Pink; in the Latest in His Series on Striking Images, Our Columnist Looks at How We Are Influenced by Colour

Article excerpt

Byline: Charles Saatchi the naked eye

HOW do the Emperors and Empresses of fashion decree the colour that will transfix next year's most stylish clothes? What makes a particular shade so cosmic, tribes of women consumed by being fashion-forward will cheerfully kill for it? It would probably be instructive to simply listen to an expert -- the Anna Wintour-esque character in The Devil Wears Prada who explained it so succinctly: "What you don't know is that that sweater is not just blue, it's not turquoise, it's not lapis, it's actually cerulean. You're also blindly unaware that in 2002, Oscar de la Renta did a collection of cerulean gowns.

"Then I think it was Yves St Laurent, wasn't it, who showed cerulean military jackets? "And then cerulean quickly showed up in the collections of eight different designers.

"Then it filtered down through the department stores and then trickled on down into some tragic 'casual corner' where you, no doubt, fished it out of some clearance bin."

Many argue that trends start on the street -- that fashion designers are most often inspired by spotting a carelessly dressed oddball, who looked captivating on their way to a Starbucks.

Subcultures influence designers, who turn it into high fashion, which then works its way back down to the high-street.

And should some fashion gods find themselves in Lake Retba in Senegal, with its extraordinarily bright pink water, so very pink it is difficult for visitors to believe it is entirely natural -- vivid pink could become next year's must-have look.

Leslie Harrington of The Colour Association, which forecasts coming trends, reports: "We have an innate reaction to colour.

"For example, when you look at red, it does increase your heart rate. It is a stimulating hue. This goes back to caveman days of fire and danger, and the sirens of a red fire engine. …

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