Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Shopping to Get Ahead; in the Latest in His Series on Striking Images Our Columnist Looks at the Growing Craze for Cosmetic Alteration

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Shopping to Get Ahead; in the Latest in His Series on Striking Images Our Columnist Looks at the Growing Craze for Cosmetic Alteration

Article excerpt

Byline: Charles Saatchi the naked eye

AS YOU know, the number of people posting images of themselves on social media has exploded. Not surprisingly, when publishing a self-portrait you want to always look your best -- and this has created another boom.

Many more men and women are shopping around for cosmetic procedures, with a sharp rise in the past couple of years in face and neck lifts, eyelid surgery, nose adjustments, brow lifts and ear corrections. The Botox generation of women is no longer satisfied with facial injections and fillers, and are moving more readily to the next step.

Men are undergoing facial rejuvenation at a faster rate than women, aiming to reduce signs of ageing, or to simply improve their image and self-esteem.

Many want a quick turnaround so they opt for basic chemical peels, ablative skin resurfacing and injections to soften wrinkles around the eyes and brows -- low-risk, fairly instant recovery time and immediate results.

This isn't mere vanity. Agreeablelooking people gain distinct advantages in society -- and always have done. It is simply that in the modern age, people are better able to improve on what nature has bestowed.

Research studies make depressing reading for most of us who are not blessed with Instagram-ready appeal. Alarmingly, they report that even attractive children are more popular with classmates. Teachers also look favourably upon them and they are usually given higher evaluations -- with greater expectations -- which in itself is shown to often improve performance.

Pleasing-looking job applicants have also been demonstrated to stand a better chance of securing desirable jobs with higher salaries.

Should they even find themselves in a courtroom, attractive defendants are found guilty less often, and frequently receive less severe sentences.

In general, we seem to believe the "what is beautiful is good" stereotype -- an irrational, deeply held belief that appealing-looking people possess other desirable qualities, such as competence, moral virtue and social confidence. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.