Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Sleeping Rough to Celebrate the Spring Equinox; Last Night a Woman Spent the Night on a Mattress on the Northumberland Moors. DAVID WHETSTONE Explains Why

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Sleeping Rough to Celebrate the Spring Equinox; Last Night a Woman Spent the Night on a Mattress on the Northumberland Moors. DAVID WHETSTONE Explains Why

Article excerpt

Byline: DAVID WHETSTONE

IF you're reading this over your breakfast, enjoying toast and a cuppa after rolling from under your duvet perhaps, spare a thought for Lucy May Schofield.

If all went according to plan, she spent last night on a mattress under the stars. And if the sky over Northumberland was clear of fog, she will even have seen them.

Rather than a homeless rough sleeper, Lucy is the latest artist to take up temporary residence at Highgreen, Tarset, the north Northumberland base of the organsation known as Visual Arts in Rural Communities (Varc).

But this particular artist-in-residence chose to trade the 'in residence' part of the arrangement for a night outdoors.

It was in aid of a new work of art called Awake, made to celebrate the Spring Equinox and the lengthening days that are a pleasant feature of the season.

And at this point it should be mentioned that this is no ordinary mattress.

It was covered in a light-sensitive silk sheet which, when washed, will reveal the pale image of the artist's sleeping (well, maybe sleeping) body.

Lucy's aim was that her sleep movements, along with the subsequent transformation of the washed silk as it is exposed to sunlight, would be recorded with time-lapse photography to be the substance of a short film.

The idea was that the piece should reference themes of hibernation and awakening, the emergence of spring, the passage of the sun across the landscape and the return of the longer days.

What a lovely idea! And we can only hope that Mother Nature played ball and didn't pour cold water on Lucy's plans and indeed her.

She is currently half way through her year-long stay in this remote area where hill farming is the most conspicuous occupation.

Lucy, who is following a distinguished list of Varc artists-in-residence, graduated with first class honours from the London College of Printing in 2002 and was then awarded a two-year Arts Council-funded residency at Manchester School of Art. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.