Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

History's Most Wanted; MARION MCMULLEN Takes a Tour Down the Dark Alleys of History as a New Book Explores Some of the World's Most Infamous Crimes

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

History's Most Wanted; MARION MCMULLEN Takes a Tour Down the Dark Alleys of History as a New Book Explores Some of the World's Most Infamous Crimes

Article excerpt

Byline: MARION MCMULLEN

AMERICAN bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde were the outlaw lovers who became criminal superstars during the Depression era.

"It's for the love of a man that's I'm gonna have to die," Bonnie Parker once said, and her words proved prophetic when they couple's four-year crime spree ended in 1934 in a hail of bullets following a police ambush.

When their Ford motor was towed to town, with the bullets still inside, a crowd of curious onlookers surrounded the car. Spectators collected souvenirs, including pieces of Parker's bloody clothes and hair.

One man even tried to cut off Clyde Barrow's trigger finger. Items belonging to the pair, including stolen guns and a saxophone, were also kept by members of the police posse and sold as souvenirs.

The Dallas Morning news issue announcing the deaths sold 500,000 copies and a group of Dallas newsboys later sent the largest floral tribute to Parker's funeral.

Bonnie and Clyde were not the only bank robbers to meet an untimely end in 1930s America.

Gangster and notorious bank robber John Dillinger was killed by federal agents on July 22, 1934 while fleeing from arrest and, a few months later, FBI agents killed George "Baby Face" Nelson, a bank robber and gangster who was then labelled Public Enemy Number One.

They are all featured in The Crime Book which explores the most notorious crimes in history and the criminal masterminds behind them.

It includes The James-Younger Gang, featuring American outlaw Jesse James and his brother Frank.

They robbed 12 banks, five trains, five stagecoaches and an exposition ticket booth during their crime spree in the wake of the American Civil War. Jesse was later betrayed and shot in the back by fellow gang member Robert Ford in 1882 in order to collect a $10,000 bounty.

In the UK, Irish-born Thomas Blood aimed even higher when he hatched a plan to steal the crown jewels in 1671.

He disguised himself as a fictitious clergyman called Reverend "Ayloffe" while a female accomplice posed as his wife. He flattened the crown and sawed the sceptre in half to make it easier to carry, but he and his gang were quickly caught. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.