Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

GETTING A LEG UP IN ANATOMY; Bolles Buys $78,000 Electronic Cadaver Table to Enhance Education

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

GETTING A LEG UP IN ANATOMY; Bolles Buys $78,000 Electronic Cadaver Table to Enhance Education

Article excerpt

Byline: Denise Smith Amos

Bolles Upper School teachers are trying to liven up their biology and anatomy classes by including more dead bodies.

Well, not actual dead bodies.

They'll use virtual cadavers, thanks to a new $78,000 electronic table more commonly seen in hospitals and medical schools.

Called an Anatomage table, the high-tech gadget is the size of an operating room table but it acts like a massive computer with a touch screen.

With a touch of a button, anatomy students can slice and dice without the mess, smell, cost or shock of an actual human dissection.

Bolles' aspiring doctors or scientists can get a leg up on their competition without getting their hands dirty.

School officials say the table will help students better visualize the human body and how its various systems work since the bodies can be virtually peeled down to their bones, veins, muscles and organs.

Anatomy teacher Piper Moyer-Shad said students will gain accurate insights into fully segmented bodies.

"It's a virtual dissection table based on human cadavers, which students wouldn't normally see," she said. "Usually they are looking at 3-D renderings or computer generated images .... (It will) help them visualize how the body's component parts fit and work together."

Until now, the only other Anatomage table in the Jacksonville area was at the Mayo Clinic's Weaver Simulation Center, which Bolles Upper School students and teachers have visited on occasion.

Mayo officials described last May how a surgical team used the table to plan a tricky surgery to remove a golf-ball-sized tumor from the base of a man's skull. (The Facebook video is at https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/simulation-center-3d-images-aid-surgical-planning/).

Bolles' table is scheduled for delivery to a physics lab in Schultz Hall later this month or early April. …

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