Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Cananga Odorata Flowers Give off Oil That Has Pleasant Smell; This Drought-Tolerant, Tall, Evergreen Tree Is Native to Tropical Northern Australia

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Cananga Odorata Flowers Give off Oil That Has Pleasant Smell; This Drought-Tolerant, Tall, Evergreen Tree Is Native to Tropical Northern Australia

Article excerpt

GARDENING

NEIL FISHER

EVEN in the worst of conditions you can still find that botanical gem and that was the case for me in the torrential rain last Thursday.

That was when I noticed a unique tree, just starting to flower in a home garden.

The tree in question is the Cananga odorata, commonly known as the Perfume Tree or Ylang Ylang.

The Cananga is a tall evergreen tree that commonly resembles a power pole with leaves and is a native to tropical northern Australia.

It likes warm, moist, humid areas and will grow well in any type of soil. Cananga is drought-tolerant once it is established but very tender to even the lightest frost.

It is the flowers of this tree that makes the Cananga unique.

These blooms are very fragrant, so much so the perfume can embrace an entire yard.

The flowers, though not striking in colour from a distance, hang and are like thin banana skins. Flowers start out a lime green colour, changing to yellow, and finally to orange after a few days.

The Cananga flowers produce oil, which is responsible for the very pleasant fragrance.

This oil is used in many other applications where a fragrance is required, from cosmetics, lotions, candles, bath oils and even medicinally where the scented oil is used for its calming effects. It is this that is said to be the key ingredient in Chanel #5.

MOSQUITOESARE COMING

With the torrential rain across Central Queensland over this last week one of the biggest threats to our health from the rain will be mosquitoes.

Did you know that worldwide, mosquitoes-borne diseases kill more people than any other single factor?

In Queensland viral diseases such as dengue fever, Barmah Forest virus and Ross River fever are all transmitted by mosquitoes. And our gardens and back yards could harbour the sites for the breeding of mosquitoes. …

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